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Resilient Societies Clinic - When Floods Hit The Road: The Impact Of Flooding On Urban Transit And Accessibility (A Case Study Of Kinshasa, DRC)

Resilient Societies Clinic - When Floods Hit The Road: The Impact Of Flooding On Urban Transit And Accessibility (A Case Study Of Kinshasa, DRC)

Date and Time: Thursday, November 19, 2020 | 10:00 am – 11:00 am EST

RSVP | Join via WebEx | Access Number: 172 929 1841 | Password: 2Mv9XiUVCu4

This fourth session in the resilient societies clinic explores the physical and economic impacts of the rainy season flooding in Kinshasa on public transport services and accessibility to employment. 

This analysis relies on innovative transit feed specification datasets collected under normal and flooded conditions for this study, travel survey data with the traveler's socioeconomic attributed and trip Origin-Destination information as well as high-resolution global flood maps.

By combining and processing these data, we are in a position to assess the commuting delays caused by floods and their opportunity costs, as well as identify the most critical links in the transportation network to minimize travel disruptions in the data.

Bob Kabeya (Project Manager, GoMetro and GoAscendal) will present the public transport survey exercises under dry and flooded conditions in Kinshasa. Paolo Avner (Urban Economist, GFDRR) will present the methodology and results of the study.

About the Guest Speaker

Bob Kabeya is a Congolese Civil Engineer specializing in Transportation Engineering, specifically Urban Mobility and Paratransit Reform. Bob has been working as a project manager and head of data collection at GoMetro then GoAscendal where he led the data collection exercise of several Integrated Public Transport Network projects, as well as city-wide data collections in South Africa. Recently, he completed the data collection for the World Bank resilience studies in Kinshasa in DRC, as well as Arusha, Moshi, Dodoma and Mwanza in Tanzania and he is currently leading the data collection for the World Bank digital innovation project in Southern Africa.

Chair: Nancy Lozano-Gracia, Senior Economist (Urban, Rural and Social Global Practice of the World Bank), Sustainable Development, MENA

The Human Capital Index 2020: Human Capital in the Time of COVID-19

The 2020 Human Capital Index includes health and education data covering 98 percent of the world’s population up to March 2020, providing a pre-pandemic baseline on the health and education of people in 174 countries. The update also presents a decade-long view of the evolution of human capital outcomes from 2010 through 2020. Today, hard-won human capital gains in many countries are at risk.

On the occasion of 75th Session of  the UN General Assembly, the World Bank cordially invites you to join a special briefing and discussion on the findings from the 2020 Human Capital Index Report.

Event: The Human Capital Index 2020: Human Capital in the Time of COVID-19

Date and Time: Friday, September 18, 2020 | 09:30 AM – 10:30 AM EST | Livestream (Link will be sent by email)

RSVP Link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1raqZ8l1s3_vu3kzP7Q3MOiv_woBsOKpvbLWaYyBcrbc/viewform?edit_requested=true

The United Nations is marking its 75th anniversary in 2020 at a time of great disruption for the world due to the COVID19 pandemic and the ensuing severe social and economic impacts. The year also coincides with the launch of the Decade of Action to deliver the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030 and to protect countries’ development goals.

The World Bank has just launched its 2020 Human Capital Index, which warns that the COVID-19 pandemic could threaten progress made over the past decade unless countries and international partners redouble efforts to protect and invest in people. Investments in human capital—the knowledge, skills, and health that people accumulate over their lives—are key to unlocking a child’s potential and to achieving inclusive and resilient recovery from the pandemic as well as countries' development goals.  

The 2020 Human Capital Index includes health and education data covering 98 percent of the world’s population up to March 2020, providing a pre-pandemic baseline on the health and education of people in 174 countries. The update also presents a decade-long view of the evolution of human capital outcomes from 2010 through 2020. Today, hard-won human capital gains in many countries are at risk.

Please join the World Bank and UN officials, who will present the findings of the report, and discuss ways to safeguard human capital gains and accelerate progress.

Opening Remarks: Mari Pangestu, World Bank Managing Director of Development Policy and Partnerships

Moderator: Mamta Murthi, World Bank Vice President, Human Development

Presenters:

  • Aart Kraay, Deputy Chief Economist and Director of Development Policy, World Bank
  • Roberta Gatti, Human Development Chief Economist, World Bank

Discussant: Pedro Conceição, Director of Human Development, UNDP​

Catalyzing Private Sector Investment in Climate Smart Cities

12 August 2020 - The objective of this report is to explore innovative financing instruments and approaches for catalyzing private sector financing to fill the climate-smart investment gap in cities.

12 August 2020 - The objective of this report is to explore innovative financing instruments and approaches for catalyzing private sector financing to fill the climate-smart investment gap in cities.

The report reviews the existing literature, highlights key barriers in scaling-up private investment in climate-smart urban infrastructure, and showcases innovative financial de-risking instruments and other financial instruments for private sector financing for low carbon, resilient urban investments.

The first chapter of the report introduces the topic and the second presents the challenges and the opportunities of urban climate investments. The third chapter discusses climate-smart cities and types of urban mitigation and resilience investments. The fourth chapter reviews and provides a framework to examine the interconnected layers of investment barriers specific to private investment, city financing, and climate-smart projects. Considering these risks allows investors and other stakeholders to better understand the complex web of challenges to expanding investment in urban climate projects and how they build on one another. Chapter five presents 10 case studies of innovative financing approaches to address some of these barriers and mobilize private sector finance for low carbon, resilient urban development. Finally, the conclusion in chapter six offers some key findings and considerations for the wider community of practice.

Find more information and download the full report here: https://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/librarypage/poverty-reduction/private_sector/catalyzing-private-sector-investment-in-climate-smart-cities.html