City2City
HLPF 2020 Side-Event: Imagine a post-COVID-19 city—with women's human rights
08 July 2020 - This panel discussion will challenge us to imagine the post COVID-19 city that respects women’s human rights, builds resilience and prevents crises, and puts feminist and women’s movements’ aspirations into local action. Panelists will include representatives from the feminist and women’s movement, UN agencies and mayors. The event will open up to a Town Hall meeting using Zoom and will have simultaneous interpretation.

08 July 2020 - This panel discussion will challenge us to imagine the post-COVID-19 city that respects women’s human rights, builds resilience and prevents crises, and puts feminist and women’s movements’ aspirations into local action. Panelists will include representatives from the feminist and women’s movement, UN agencies, and mayors. The event will open up to a Town Hall meeting using Zoom and will have simultaneous interpretation.

This side-event to the High-Level Political Forum 2020 is being organized by the International Alliance of Women, Feminist and Women's Movement Action Plan, NGO CSW/NY, Habitat (To Be Confirmed) and UN Women (To Be Confirmed).

Event Details:

COVID-19 and Human Development: Assessing the Crisis, Envisioning the Recovery
02 July 2020 - This note takes a capabilities approach to document the severity of the unfolding human development crisis. Such an approach implies an evaluative framework to assess the crisis and shape the policy response that emphasizes the potential for people to be and do what they aspire in life as opposed to material resources or economic activity.

02 July 2020 - The COVID-19 pandemic is unleashing a human development crisis. On some dimensions of human development, conditions today are equivalent to levels of deprivation last seen in the mid-1980s.

But the crisis is hitting hard on all of human development’s constitutive elements: income (with the largest contraction in economic activity since the Great Depression), health (directly causing a death toll over 300,000 and indirectly leading potentially to an additional 6,000 child deaths every day from preventable causes over the next 6 months) and education (with effective out-of-school rates – meaning, accounting for the inability to access the internet – in primary education expected to drop to the levels of actual rates of the mid-1980s levels). This, not counting less visible indirect effects, including increased domestic violence, yet to be fully documented.

The pandemic was superimposed on unresolved tensions between people and technology, between people and the planet, between the haves and the have-nots. These tensions were already shaping a new generation of inequalities—pertaining to enhanced capabilities, the new necessities of the 21st century, as defined in the 2019 Human Development Report. But the response to the crisis can shape how those tensions are addressed and whether inequalities in human development are reduced.

This note takes a capabilities approach to document the severity of the unfolding human development crisis. Such an approach implies an evaluative framework to assess the crisis and shape the policy response that emphasizes the potential for people to be and do what they aspire in life as opposed to material resources or economic activity. To assess the crisis, the note draws from original simulations that are based on an adjusted Human Development Index—with the education dimension modified to reflect the effects of school closures and mitigation measures—and that incorporate current projections of gross national income (GNI) per capita for 2020.

The simulations suggest conditions today would correspond to a steep and unprecedented decline in human development. With almost 9 in 10 students out of school and deep recessions in most economies (including a 4 percent drop in GNI per capita worldwide), the decline in the index –reflecting a narrowing in capabilities-- would be equivalent to erasing all the progress in human development of the past six years. Importantly, if conditions in school access are restored, capabilities related to education would immediately bounce back – while the income dimension would follow the path of the economic recovery post-crisis. The simulations also show the importance of promoting equity in capabilities. In a scenario with more equitable internet access—where each country closes the gap with the leaders in its human development category—the decline in human development would be more than halved. This would be eminently affordable. In 2018 it was estimated that $100 billion would be needed to close the gap in internet access in low- and middle-income countries—or about 1 percent of the extraordinary fiscal programmes announced around the world so far.

The note suggests three principles to shape the response to the crisis:

  • Look at the response through an equity lens.i Countries, communities and groups already lagging in enhanced capabilities will be particularly affected, and leaving them further behind will have long-term impacts on human development.
  • Focus on people’s enhanced capabilities. This could reconcile apparent tradeoffs between public health and economic activity (a means to the end of expanding capabilities) but would also help build resilience for future shocks.
  • Follow a coherent multidimensional approach. Since the crisis has multiple interconnected dimensions (health, economic, and several social aspects, decisions on the allocation of fiscal resources that can either further lock-in or break free from carbon-intensive production and consumption), a systemic approach—rather than a sector-by-sector sequential approach—is essential. A recent survey conducted in 14 countries found that 71 percent of adults globally consider that climate change is as serious a crisis as COVID-19, with two-thirds supporting government actions to prioritise climate change during the recovery. ii

The United Nations has proposed a framework for the immediate socioeconomic response,iii with which this note is fully consistent and meant to inform and further flesh out both the analysis of the crisis and possible responses.

Finally, the note also highlights the importance of collective action—at the community, country, and global levels. And the response to this crisis is showing how people around the world are responding collectively. The adoption of social distancing behaviour—which in some cases started before formal policies were put in place—could not possibly be fully enforced. It depended on the voluntary cooperation of billions of people. And it was done in response to a shared global risk that brought to the fore as a priority something other than having economies grow more rapidly. If we needed proof of concept that humanity can respond collectively to a shared global challenge, we are now living through it.

Read the full report here or download the attached PDF of the report.

COVID-19 and Human Development: Assessing the Crisis, Envisioning the Recovery
02 July 2020 - This note takes a capabilities approach to document the severity of the unfolding human development crisis. Such an approach implies an evaluative framework to assess the crisis and shape the policy response that emphasizes the potential for people to be and do what they aspire in life as opposed to material resources or economic activity. 

02 July 2020 - The COVID-19 pandemic is unleashing a human development crisis. On some dimensions of human development, conditions today are equivalent to levels of deprivation last seen in the mid-1980s.

But the crisis is hitting hard on all of human development’s constitutive elements: income (with the largest contraction in economic activity since the Great Depression), health (directly causing a death toll over 300,000 and indirectly leading potentially to an additional 6,000 child deaths every day from preventable causes over the next 6 months) and education (with effective out-of-school rates – meaning, accounting for the inability to access the internet – in primary education expected to drop to the levels of actual rates of the mid-1980s levels). This, not counting less visible indirect effects, including increased domestic violence, yet to be fully documented.

The pandemic was superimposed on unresolved tensions between people and technology, between people and the planet, between the haves and the have-nots. These tensions were already shaping a new generation of inequalities—pertaining to enhanced capabilities, the new necessities of the 21st century, as defined in the 2019 Human Development Report. But the response to the crisis can shape how those tensions are addressed and whether inequalities in human development are reduced.

This note takes a capabilities approach to document the severity of the unfolding human development crisis. Such an approach implies an evaluative framework to assess the crisis and shape the policy response that emphasizes the potential for people to be and do what they aspire in life as opposed to material resources or economic activity. To assess the crisis, the note draws from original simulations that are based on an adjusted Human Development Index—with the education dimension modified to reflect the effects of school closures and mitigation measures—and that incorporate current projections of gross national income (GNI) per capita for 2020.

The simulations suggest conditions today would correspond to a steep and unprecedented decline in human development. With almost 9 in 10 students out of school and deep recessions in most economies (including a 4 percent drop in GNI per capita worldwide), the decline in the index –reflecting a narrowing in capabilities-- would be equivalent to erasing all the progress in human development of the past six years. Importantly, if conditions in school access are restored, capabilities related to education would immediately bounce back – while the income dimension would follow the path of the economic recovery post-crisis. The simulations also show the importance of promoting equity in capabilities. In a scenario with more equitable internet access—where each country closes the gap with the leaders in its human development category—the decline in human development would be more than halved. This would be eminently affordable. In 2018 it was estimated that $100 billion would be needed to close the gap in internet access in low- and middle-income countries—or about 1 percent of the extraordinary fiscal programmes announced around the world so far.

The note suggests three principles to shape the response to the crisis:

  • Look at the response through an equity lens.i Countries, communities and groups already lagging in enhanced capabilities will be particularly affected, and leaving them further behind will have long-term impacts on human development.
  • Focus on people’s enhanced capabilities. This could reconcile apparent tradeoffs between public health and economic activity (a means to the end of expanding capabilities) but would also help build resilience for future shocks.
  • Follow a coherent multidimensional approach. Since the crisis has multiple interconnected dimensions (health, economic, and several social aspects, decisions on the allocation of fiscal resources that can either further lock-in or break free from carbon-intensive production and consumption), a systemic approach—rather than a sector-by-sector sequential approach—is essential. A recent survey conducted in 14 countries found that 71 percent of adults globally consider that climate change is as serious a crisis as COVID-19, with two-thirds supporting government actions to prioritise climate change during the recovery. ii

The United Nations has proposed a framework for the immediate socioeconomic response,iii with which this note is fully consistent and meant to inform and further flesh out both the analysis of the crisis and possible responses.

Finally, the note also highlights the importance of collective action—at the community, country, and global levels. And the response to this crisis is showing how people around the world are responding collectively. The adoption of social distancing behaviour—which in some cases started before formal policies were put in place—could not possibly be fully enforced. It depended on the voluntary cooperation of billions of people. And it was done in response to a shared global risk that brought to the fore as a priority something other than having economies grow more rapidly. If we needed proof of concept that humanity can respond collectively to a shared global challenge, we are now living through it.

Read the full report here or download the attached PDF of the report.

Cities as bridges between SDGs and citizens in a post-COVID-19 world: elements for socio-economic recovery

The Venice City Solutions Series is a yearly event addressing issues that are central to the implementation of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at local level, with specific focus to the

role of local and regional governments as key drivers of the 2030 Agenda. In 2019, the event focused on how the SDGs can be an instrument to create citizenship and to promote the values of the Agenda as well as on strategies to bring the SDGs closer to the people.

Each year, the organizers of Venice City Solutions 2030 bring the recommendations of the event to the formal mechanism of the HLPF. This year, this official side event has adapted the narrative of SDG role in creating citizenship to the situation created by the COVID 19 pandemic. 

As the COVID-19 global health crisis has demonstrated, we live in an uncertain world; and recovering from the current crisis is going to require both strong individual action and a monumental collective effort. The contribution and collaboration of citizens in the recovery phase of the pandemic is going to be even more relevant than in our recent past. Local and regional governments are responding to the emergency by keeping essential services going, caring for the most vulnerable and finding rapid solutions to adapt to changing and unpredictable needs. Socio-economic recovery, with a global economy that has come to a sudden stop, is going to require local development and a lot of local action. Local and regional governments are going to play a substantial role in bringing the citizens along, on one end, and to support local businesses and local economic action, on the other. Within this new context, coordination between spheres of government and policy coherence between central and local governments will be more important than ever. Multi-level governance needs to be strengthened both vertically and horizontally.

The event will gather representatives of local and regional governments, their associations, Mayors, Governors and other governmental representatives and selected partners to discuss the way ahead for SDG implementation at local level.

This HLPF side event is co-organized by AICCRE, UCLG, UNDP, UN-Habitat and the UN SDG Action Campaign.

Tackling Social Norms: A game changer for gender inequalities
02 July 2020 - The Gender Social Norms Index (GSNI) measures how social beliefs obstruct gender equality in areas like politics, work, and education, and contains data from 75 countries, covering over 80 percent of the world’s population. The analysis reveals that despite decades of progress closing the equality gap between men and women, close to 90 percent of men and women hold some sort of bias against women, providing new clues to the invisible barriers women face in achieving equality. The publication also includes the GSNI trends for 31 countries, representing 59 percent of the global population. The trends show that while in some countries there have been improvements, in others, attitudes appear to have worsened in recent years, signaling that progress cannot be taken for granted.

02 July 2020 - Gender disparities are a persistent form of inequality in every country. Despite remarkable progress in some areas, no country in the world—rich or poor—has achieved gender equality. All too often, women and girls are discriminated against in health, in education, at home, and in the labour market with negative repercussions for their freedoms.

This is the time for a reality check. The commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (Beijing+25) provides an opportunity to reassess the path to gender equality and adjust actions to close gender gaps.

The Gender Social Norms Index (GSNI) measures how social beliefs obstruct gender equality in areas like politics, work, and education, and contains data from 75 countries, covering over 80 percent of the world’s population.

The analysis reveals that, despite decades of progress closing the equality gap between men and women, close to 90 percent of men and women hold some sort of bias against women, providing new clues to the invisible barriers women face in achieving equality.

According to the index, about half of the world’s men and women feel that men make better political leaders, and over 40 percent feel that men make better business executives and that men have more right to a job when jobs are scarce. 28 percent think it is justified for a man to beat his wife.

The publication also includes the GSNI trends for 31 countries, representing 59 percent of the global population. The trends show that while in some countries there have been improvements, in others, attitudes appear to have worsened in recent years, signaling that progress cannot be taken for granted.

Read the full report here or download the attached PDF of the report.

Unlocking Investment in Nature for a Just Urban Transition

Organized in parallel to the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, this webinar will highlight the findings of UNEP's latest "State of Finance for Nature" report and explore what's needed to accelerate the financing of urban nature.

Unlocking Investment in Nature for a Just Urban Transition

Organized in parallel to the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, this webinar will highlight the findings of UNEP's latest "State of Finance for Nature" report and explore what's needed to accelerate the financing of urban nature.

REGISTER

DATE & TIME
17 Jan 2023, 3:00PM EST
HOSTED BY
United Nations Environment Programme

Madrid riverfront development. Flickr/ M. Peinado.

Urban nature-based solutions (NbS) can contribute to the achievement of multiple Sustainable Development Goals, such as climate adaptation and mitigation; sustainable food production and consumption; clean water and air; thermal comfort through cooler streets and buildings; and access to public green spaces for recreation and physical and mental well-being.  

But for urban nature to reach its full potential, investment in nature needs scaling up. The latest edition of UNEP’s State of Finance of Nature report recommends that investments in NbS triple by 2030 to ensure we meet our global climate, biodiversity and land degradation targets. Investing in nature also makes economic sense: nature-based infrastructure is on average 50% more cost-effective than ‘grey’ alternatives and delivers 28% better value for money.  

At the Biodiversity COP15 in Montreal in December 2022, mayors across the globe called for increased direct financing to allow cities to implement ambitious greening and ecosystem restoration projects. Building on the mayors' call, this webinar will highlight the findings of the "Financing Nature in Cities" annex to UNEP's State of Finance for Nature 2022 report, and explore the levers to scale up investments for nature in cities. 

The webinar will take place in parallel to a closed session at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in Davos, where industry and finance leaders will discuss de-risking investment in urban nature-based solutions. 

Speakers (TBC)

  • Sharon Gil, Acting Head, Cities Unit, UN Environment Programme
  • Luis Donaldo Colosio RiojaMayor of Monterrey, Mexico 
  • Eugénie L. Birch, Co-director, Penn Institute for Urban Research 
  • Andrea FernandezManaging Director, Climate Finance, Knowledge and Partnerships, C40 Cities
  • Mauricio Rodas, Former Mayor of Quito, Ecuador, and Visiting Scholar, UPenn
  • Roland Hunziker, Director, Sustainable Buildings and Cities, World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)
  • Craig Hanson, Managing Director and Executive Vice President for Programs, World Resources Institute (WRI)
  • Kobie Brand, Deputy Secretary General of ICLEI / Regional Director of ICLEI Africa / Global Director of ICLEI’s Cities Biodiversity Centre

Retrieved from https://www.shiftcities.org/event/unlocking-investment-nature-just-urban-transformation

Nature-based Solutions Finance for NDCs
This report offers reference material and inspiration for UNDP and interested stakeholders to further support the design and implementation of NBSs in NDCs by enabling countries and local stakeholders to access various financing streams. 

Nature-based Solutions Finance for NDCs

Published by UNDP on 4 November 2022

Climate change and biodiversity loss are two of the biggest global challenges this century and arguably the greatest regional challenge in the Asia-Pacific region. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic highlights the critical connection between human health and the health of nature. The pandemic continues to result in significant health, economic and social costs for small island developing states (SIDS), least developed countries (LDCs), and middle-income countries across urban and rural settings from the large megacities of Dhaka and Bangkok to the smallest island atolls in the Pacific.

Nature-based solutions (NbSs) are critical to climate action and one of the most requested areas of support to enhance nationally determined contributions (NDCs). Importantly, NbSs in NDCs can support climate mitigation and adaptation, as well as slow biodiversity loss, in a cost-effective manner. These intertwined crises require an integrated approach and unprecedented cooperation to achieve a nature-positive economic recovery and an equitable carbon-neutral and sustainable future. NbSs can play a critical role is this approach.

This report offers reference material and inspiration for UNDP and interested stakeholders to further support the design and implementation of NBSs in NDCs by enabling countries and local stakeholders to access various financing streams. It presents the importance of financing NBSs for NDCs through public, private and philanthropic foundations. The report also provides a non-exhaustive regional mapping of existing examples of financing NBSs at scale across climate change mitigation (e.g., REDD+), climate change adaptation (CCA), biodiversity, and disaster risk reduction (DRR) in Asia-Pacific. UNDP’s work in the nature, climate and energy portfolio has employed several of these options. Five case studies illustrate lessons for Asia[1]Pacific in financing NbSs for NDCs - Public-Private Partnership Approach; Debt-for-Nature Swap; Sustainable Tourism in Protected Natural Areas; Sustainable Cities; Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use sector.

Access the full report here: https://www.undp.org/publications/nature-based-solutions-finance-ndcs

or download the attached PDF of the report

The Future We Create: How Innovation Can Advance Disability-inclusive Development
On the occasion of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (December 3rd), we invite you to join a leading-edge UNDP webinar, which will provide a platform to exchange good practices, discuss challenges and identify solutions on innovation that supports disability-inclusive development.

The Future We Create: How Innovation Can Advance Disability-inclusive Development

Webinar by UNDP | 6 December 2022 | 8:00 - 9:30 am Eastern Standard Time (EST)

Description

Innovation that does not consider knowledge, skills and experience of persons with disabilities and does not address the barriers they face can further exacerbate discrimination and exclusion, reversing our progress towards sustainable development and inclusive futures.



International Sign Language (ISL) Interpretation and live captioning (CART) will be provided during the event.

Register here: bit.ly/FutureWeCreate

Heads of Ukrainian communities learn best governance practices of Estonia and Sweden

With the support of UNDP and the EU, leaders of communities in eastern Ukraine took part in an international visit, where they gained valuable experience and knowledge, opened up new opportunities and established partnership relations

Heads of Ukrainian communities learn best governance practices of Estonia and Sweden

Published by UNDP on 28 November 2022

With the support of UNDP and the EU, leaders of communities in eastern Ukraine took part in an international visit, where they gained valuable experience and knowledge, opened up new opportunities and established partnership relations.

Participants of the international study visit, 24-29 October 2022. Photo credit: Viktor Huzun / UNDP in Ukraine

Kyiv, 28 November 2022 – The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Ukraine, with the financial support of the European Union, organized an international study visit to Estonia and Sweden on 24-29 October 2022. The topic of the visits was the study of the best practices of effective crisis response and management, the implementation of development projects at the local level, and the study of ways to improve the quality of regional project development.

The establishment of cooperation between the amalgamated communities of eastern Ukraine and the municipalities of Estonia began in 2019 within the UN Recovery and Peacebuilding Programme support. The visits studied Estonia's acquired experience in decentralisation processes, particularly e-governance and democracy. As part of the partnership activities, the forum "Estonia's experience for eastern Ukraine: e-governance, decentralisation, business" was also held, which later became the basis of new strong connections between the Ukrainian and Estonian communities.

Frederik Coene, Head of Cooperation at the EU Delegation to Ukraine, noted that the study of the best European governance practices, in particular, the work and structure of local authorities, inclusive regulation, fair and efficient provision of public services, is essential for creating a favourable environment for the country's recovery.

"The government of Estonia was one of the first to support Ukraine in granting the status of a candidate for EU membership. The experience of Estonian partners is invaluable for Ukrainian communities on their way to recovery,” he added. “In many contexts, there is a strong connection between governance and peacebuilding, which is why our efforts with a focus on good local governance are designed to help community leaders build better and more effective policies on the ground.”

This year's study trip aimed to provide participants with a deeper understanding of the concepts of anti-crisis governance in the municipalities of Estonia and Sweden to adopt the best management experience for implementing best practices during the post-war recovery of Ukraine. Among the participants were representatives of the communities of Dnipropetrovsk, Mykolaiv, Sumy and Kharkiv oblasts.

The impressive agenda included visits by the participants to the Ministry of Finance of Estonia, the Tallinn City Council, the Association of Municipalities of Estonia, the Estonian Rescue Board, the Rakveri City Administration, the Agency for Business and Innovation, the Embassy of Ukraine in Estonia, meetings with members of the Ukrainian community in Estonia, as well as visits to the Stockholm City Council and the Sweden's government agency for development cooperation (SIDA).

Jaco Cilliers, interim UNDP Resident Representative in Ukraine, noted that UNDP comprehensively supports local government authorities, especially in the frontline oblasts of Ukraine, providing tools for training, expert exchange of experience and consulting on new directions of development.

“As a result of the visit, five communities have already started negotiations on establishing partnership relations with the municipalities of Estonia, Sweden and other EU countries, which will facilitate the exchange of international experience in carrying out comprehensive reforms, organizing administrative territories and local self-government,” he added. “We at UNDP are doing everything necessary to support local communities to contribute to sustainable peace and achieve long-term development results effectively.”

The study visit was organised with the support of the UNDP within the UN Recovery and Peacebuilding Programme and the European Union's financial support.

Background

The United Nations Recovery and Peacebuilding Programme (UN RPP) is being implemented by four United Nations agencies: the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the UN Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO). Eleven international partners support the Programme: The European Union (EU), the European Investment Bank (EIB), the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, and the governments of Canada, Denmark, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Sweden and Switzerland.

Media enquiriesYuliia Samus, UNDP Ukraine Head of Communications; e-mail: yuliia.samus@undp.org

Retrieved from https://www.undp.org/ukraine/press-releases/heads-ukrainian-communities-learn-best-governance-practices-estonia-and-sweden

How Just Transition can help deliver the Paris Agreement
This new report unpacks why a just transition is central to delivering the Paris Agreement and Sustainable Development Goals, analyses key global and regional trends, and explores what a just transition means for UNDP’s work. 

How Just Transition can help deliver the Paris Agreement

Published by UNDP Climate Promise

How a Just Transition can help deliver the Paris Agreement

The importance of just transition is now recognized

A green transition to a net-zero future is key to unlocking the Paris Agreement’s global climate goals. However, if not managed well, the required socioeconomic transformation runs the risk of further increasing social inequality, exclusion, civil unrest, and less competitive businesses, sectors, and markets. Increasingly, countries are acknowledging these risks and in turn are taking action to integrate a just and equitable transition of their economies into their short- and long-term climate plans, known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and Long-Term Strategies (LTS).

While the concept of just transition is widely used to advocate for social justice and equity in climate action, there is no universally accepted definition, and the perception varies between countries and regions. For UNDP, just transition is fundamentally about principle, process, and practice. UNDP’s framework of support therefore involves increasing country awareness of the principles of a just transition, strengthening their ability to engage in just transition processes, and developing capacity to implement just transition practices. 

UNDP analysis reveals that, as of 31 October 2022, just transition principles are now reflected in 38% of NDCs, 56% of LTS, and a growing number of high-profile global initiatives. More, however, needs to be done.

UNDP’s framework for incorporating just transition in NDCs and LTS 

UNDP has been working through the Climate Promise to support countries to connect the dots between climate action, social inclusion and gender equality, and sustainable development.

As part of these efforts, four key entry points have been identified for integrating just transition into NDCs and LTS:

Just Transition Framework

  1. Assessments;
  2. Engagement through social dialogues and stakeholder engagement;
  3. Institutional, policy, and capacity-building support; and
  4. Finance.

Under the Climate Promise, UNDP has supported, or is supporting, 34 countries and territories to strengthen just transition across these four areas (see map below).

Download the report to learn how UNDP is partnering with SerbiaSouth AfricaCosta RicaIndia, and Antigua and Barbuda on their visions for a green, just, and net-zero future.

Continue reading: https://climatepromise.undp.org/research-and-reports/how-just-transition-can-help-deliver-paris-agreement

Download the full report here: https://climatepromise.undp.org/sites/default/files/research_report_document/UNDP_Just_Transition_Report_0.pdf

or access the PDF attachment of the full report.