City2City
Sustainable Coastal and Marine Tourism Webinar Series

These webinars will present key insights from the body of work commissioned by the Ocean Panel on coastal and marine tourism, including a special report: ‘Opportunities for Transforming Coastal and Marine Tourism: Towards Sustainability, Regeneration and Resilience’.

Sustainable Coastal and Marine Tourism Webinar Series

Wednesday 18 January 2023

06:00-07:30 GMT (UTC + 0) - Asia/Pacific audience

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OR

14:00-15:30 GMT (UTC+ 0) - North America/Europe/Africa audience

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According to new research from the High Level Panel for a Sustainable Ocean Economy (Ocean Panel), coastal and marine tourism represents at least 50% of all global tourism and supports millions of jobs and livelihoods worldwide.

The global pandemic revealed the fragility of the current model of global tourism. As the world begins to recover and reopen again, all destinations will be faced with a choice. Either return to business as usual or use this moment as an opportunity to invest in a more sustainable model of coastal and marine tourism that will be prepared to address eminent and future crises, like climate change and biodiversity loss, and which equitably distribute wealth in host destinations to ensure economic well-being of coastal and island nations. 

Despite extreme economic hardship, many inspiring stories have emerged over the past few years from coastal and marine areas. This global webinar series will provide an opportunity to hear from experts across the tourism industry on innovation and best practice, with a view to understanding how different actors within the tourism sector are considering the future of coastal and marine tourism. 
 
These webinars will present key insights from the body of work commissioned by the Ocean Panel on coastal and marine tourism, including a special report: ‘Opportunities for Transforming Coastal and Marine Tourism: Towards Sustainability, Regeneration and Resilience’.

They will also provide an opportunity to hear from experts across the tourism industry on innovation and best practice, with a view to understanding how different actors within the tourism sector are considering the future of coastal and marine tourism.

Participants

Asia/Pacific Event

  • Arif Havas Oegroseno, Indonesian Ambassador to Germany
  • Russell Reichelt, Sherpa to the Australian Prime Minister for the Ocean Panel
  • Eliza Northrop, Co-Director, Sustainable Development Reform Hub, University of New South Wales
  • Randy Durband, CEO, GSTC
  • Wouter Schalken, Senior Sustainable Tourism Specialist, ADB 
  • Darrell Wade, Co-founder and Chairman, Intrepid Travel 
  • Anna Spenceley, Chair, IUCN WCPA Tourism and Protected Areas Specialist Group (TAPAS Group) (Moderator)
  • Other speakers to be confirmed

North America/Europe/Africa Event

  • Peter Schuhmann, Professor of Economics, UNC Wilmington
  • Eleanor Carter, Co-Director of Chumbe Island MPA, and Executive Director of Sustainable Solutions International Consulting 
  • Osbourne Chin, Senior Director, Tourism Policy and Monitoring, Ministry of Tourism Jamaica
  • Ilihia Gionson, Public Affairs Officer, Hawaii Tourism Authority 
  • Mauricio Martínez Miramontes, Strategic Partnerships Coordinator, La Mano del Mono
  • Sue Snyman, Director of Research, School of Wildlife Conservation, African Leadership University
  • Cynthia Barzuna, Director, Ocean Action 2030 Coalition, World Resources Institute (Moderator)
  • Other speakers to be confirmed

Register for the Asia/Pacific event here or for the North America/Europe/Africa Event here.

Organizer logos.

Cover image by Edgar Chaparro / Unsplash 

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/events/2023/1/sustainable-coastal-and-marine-tourism-webinar-series?utm_campaign=wridigest&utm_source=wridigest-2023-01-11&utm_medium=email

South to South Dialogue: Lessons Learned, Shared Experiences and What's Ahead for the Air Quality Community of Practice

South to South Dialogue: Lessons Learned, Shared Experiences and What's Ahead for the Air Quality Community of Practice

>January 24, 2023 | 10 -  | Online

Time zones: 9:00 am Mexico City (GMT-6), 10:00 am Washington D.C. (GMT-5), 10:00 am Bogota (GMT-5), 6:00 pm Nairobi (GMT +3)

Participants from Mexico, Colombia and Africa will share their experiences, needs and lessons learned as active members of the Air Quality Community of Practice.

Further details of the next stage of this initiative will also be announced in order to continue creating community and sharing best practices and tools for air quality management and climate change mitigation.

Speakers to be announced

Cover image by: George Lamson/Flickr

Register here: https://www.wri.org/events/2023/1/south-south-dialogue-lessons-learned-shared-experiences-and-whats-ahead-air-quality?utm_campaign=wridigest&utm_source=wridigest-2023-01-11&utm_medium=email

Stories to Watch 2023
World Resources Institute's Ani Dasgupta will share insights into the big stories in 2023, including what actions governments, businesses, institutions and people must take to get the world on the right path.

Stories to Watch 2023

The big moments, trends and people that will shape the world in 2023

 -  | Online | Register here 

2022 was a year of disruption. The ongoing effects of COVID, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, inflation, climate impacts and more led to major upheaval in people’s lives.

Yet there were also major developments in policy and actions by governments, businesses and institutions that could help turn the tide. World leaders are prioritizing action on nature and climate and multilateral meetings led to new breakthroughs. These silver linings bring hope that out of the many crises, a new and better approach could emerge.

Will we see more progress toward more sustainable and equitable development in 2023? 

At this pivotal moment, Ani Dasgupta will share insights into the big stories in 2023, including what actions governments, businesses, institutions and people must take to get the world on the right path.

Cover photo credit: ZUMA Press, Inc. / Alamy Stock Photo

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/events/2023/1/stories-watch-2023?utm_campaign=wridigest&utm_source=wridigest-2023-01-11&utm_medium=email

An Innovative Jobs Program in Odisha, India Helped Informal Workers Through COVID-19 and Beyond

Since 2020, Urban Wage Employment Initiative (UWEI) has supported vulnerable populations and made Odisha’s slums more resistant to climate change while creating a permanent public employment program for the urban poor. Its story is an example of how governments can deliver relief in a moment of deep crisis while fostering long-term sustainable urban development.

An Innovative Jobs Program in Odisha, India Helped Informal Workers Through COVID-19 and Beyond

January 3, 2023 

By Salome Gongadze and Anne Maassen 

When India’s federal government announced a public health lockdown on March 24, 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, it generated desperate scenes. Economic activity ground to a halt. Millions of migrant workers traveled back to their home states.

In the eastern Indian state of Odisha, it quickly became clear to officials that they were facing not only a public health emergency, but a potentially catastrophic unemployment and poverty crisis.

The state’s large urban poor population could not survive the lockdown on state aid alone. Slum dwellers — which make up about 25% of Odisha’s population in cities like Bhubaneswar, Cuttack and Rourkela — as well as thousands of migrant workers returning from other states were particularly vulnerable. Many worked primarily in the informal sector, earning their livelihood from street hawking and petty trading of fruit, textiles and small household goods; day labor; shoe shining and other forms of low-skilled self-employment. Informal workers lacked the job security or social safety nets to support them through the shutdown. 

So Odisha’s Housing and Urban Development Department (HUDD) decided on an ambitious response. Within weeks of the shutdown, the department launched the Urban Wage Employment Initiative (UWEI), a large-scale jobs program to employ the urban poor and informal and migrant laborers in public works projects — mainly ones targeted at building resilience to climate change.

Since 2020, UWEI has supported vulnerable populations and made Odisha’s slums more resistant to climate change while creating a permanent public employment program for the urban poor. Its story is an example of how governments can deliver relief in a moment of deep crisis while fostering long-term sustainable urban development.

Engaging Informal Workers: A New Model for Public Works Projects

While public employment programs have existed in India for a long time, most focus on rural settings.  Executing a large-scale jobs program in cities was not something that had been done before.

HUDD leadership quickly tapped into existing urban service programs like the Indian government’s JAGA Mission, a slum-upgrading program established in 2017. They also worked closely with local community organizations such as slum dwellers’ associations and women’s groups to plan public works projects. This was a departure from the traditional process, which would involve competitive bids from professional contractors. By designating community groups as the project’s “alternative service providers,” the initiative made sure all benefits stayed in the local community and that marginalized groups, including women, received job opportunities. (Learn more about this approach in WRI’s World Resources Report: Towards a More Equal City.)

Community organizations also gathered feedback from citizens about local infrastructure needs, identified job seekers and supervised the execution of works projects.

Women in a public space in Odisha, India

Women gather at an open-air community center in Odisha, India. Community centers are one of many public works projects implemented through the Urban Wage Employment Initiative. Photo by WRI

Changing Odisha for the Better through Climate-Resilient Infrastructure

The public works projects included in UWEI’s initial stages relieved immediate joblessness and acute poverty while also creating new infrastructure and amenities for cities in Odisha. For example, UWEI commissioned the construction of rainwater-harvesting structures, undertook large-scale water drain desilting, and maintained flood-mitigation and monsoon preparedness infrastructure — critical infrastructure for communities prone to floods and typhoons.

Across all of Odisha’s 114 cities, UWEI workers built 800 new mini parks, 300 playgrounds, 1,200 open-air gyms, 350 kilometers of paved walkways, and 1,000 playgrounds and open-air community centers. And the number of community assets continues to grow.

Playground in Odisha, India

A boy plays on one of 300 playgrounds built as part of Odisha's Urban Wage Employment Initiative. Photo by WRI 

Pabitra Choudhury, the secretary of a regional women’s group, said that before the UWEI program, people used outdoor toilets, roads were muddy and dirty, and children would frequently get infections from playing in the dirt and dust. “Now, children are playing with swings and other things,” Choudhury said. “They are developing. After the community hall was built, children are coming to watch TV, listen to storytelling, learning dance. Our community is clean. For that we are feeling good.”

In February 2021, the State Government of Odisha converted UWEI into a permanent successor program, called MUKTA (translated as the “Chief Minister’s Wage Employment Scheme,”or Mukhyamantri Karma Tatpara Abhiyan), which continues to be implemented by Odisha’s HUDD. MUKTA aims to continually provide work opportunities through community groups.

Not only has Odisha as a whole benefited from better physical infrastructure, many small business owners and self-employed workers also experienced improved economic prospects.

“By getting MUKTA and developing this area, shops opened like a manure shop, tiffin shop and a fast food shop,” said Sibani Nayak, president of the Maa Banadurga slum association. “We are getting more customers; we are having good income.”

Constructing a public works project in Odisha, India

Odisha, India's Urban Wage Employment Initiative employed more than 700,000 urban workers in building public works projects throughout the state. Photo by WRI

A Lasting Solution for Odisha's Informal Workers

UWEI was an effective short-term emergency response program to the economic tumult of the pandemic lockdown, ultimate employing 700,000 urban workers, with $12 million in wages paid out. The initial program showed that public employment could be delivered through a multi-level, community-based approach that benefited the state’s most vulnerable populations.

The experience of running UWEI and then institutionalizing it as MUKTA changed mindsets in the state and national government about how pro-poor urban development can be effectively delivered. It demonstrates how public employment schemes, previously implemented in mainly rural contexts in India, may be set up to benefit informal workers in cities.

While most cities around the world are no longer facing COVID-19-related lockdowns, with ongoing threats from climate change and other unforeseen challenges, the future of urban governance appears to be shifting into a mode where uncertainty is the norm rather than the exception. Odisha’s UWEI-MUKTA project shows how local governments can combine calculated risk-taking with creatively leveraged resources to respond to crises with solutions that benefit communities over both the short and long terms.

WRI Ross Center Prize for Cities

Odisha's Urban Wage Employment Initiative (UWEI) is a finalist for the 2021-2022 WRI Ross Center Prize for Cities. Learn more.

The 2021-2022 WRI Ross Center Prize for Cities celebrates projects and initiatives showing how to live and thrive in turbulent times. From five finalists, one grand prize winner will be announced February 1, 2023.

Cover Image by: WRI

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/insights/odisha-india-jobs-informal-workers?utm_campaign=wridigest&utm_source=wridigest-2023-01-11&utm_medium=email

COP27’s Success Hinges on Loss and Damage Finance Discussions

For decades, vulnerable nations have called for financial support from rich countries to help them cope with increasingly alarming and damaging climate impacts that they hold little responsibility for causing. Yet many developed countries, including the U.S. and E.U., have long resisted their requests. The upcoming U.N. climate summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt (COP27) offers an opportunity to break the stalemate on this critical issue and start taking action. Here’s how:

COP27’s Success Hinges on Loss and Damage Finance Discussions

Authors: Ani Dasgupta and Preety Bhandari | Published by World Resources Institute (WRI) on 28 October 2022

Cover Image by: Abdul Majeed/EU Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid

Since the monsoon season started in June, the worst floods in Pakistan’s history have killed 1,700 people and left more than 33 million homeless. One-third of the entire country was under water at one point, decimating its crops, destroying clean water sources and infrastructure, and causing $40 billion in damages. The destruction is projected to lower Pakistan’s GDP growth from 5% in FY2022 to 2% in FY2023.

This is not just an extreme weather event — it's an economic disaster. And while these numbers lay out the costs and scale of devastation, they fail to factor in the full impact — from the emotional and physical toll on affected families, to the effort and courage needed to rebuild.

Pakistan is far from the only country to experience climate-fueled disasters this year. Droughts in Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia have killed millions of livestock and destroyed crops. Spiking temperatures in the Sahel — a region spanning 10 countries and home to 135 million people — are drying up water supplies and threatening to trigger a major food and migration crisis.

These are the devastating impacts communities around the world are living with under just 1.1 degrees C (2 degrees F) of global temperature rise — and the world is on track to warm far more than that. As Pakistan’s recent flooding illustrates, much of the destruction already goes beyond the limits of many families’ and communities’ ability to adapt. These “losses and damages” occur when climate impacts cannot be avoided, either due to reaching the climate tipping point of irreversible impacts or due to lack of resources to adapt.

Loss and damage disproportionally affects vulnerable populations — people on the front lines of the crisis with the least resources. Almost always, these are also the people who have contributed the least to the problem. Each dollar of damage has a more severe impact in a poor, vulnerable community than in a wealthier one. Climate impacts are happening across the world, but it is only the rich countries that have the resources to weather them. For example, the recent devastation of Hurricane Ian in the U.S. may have caused $67 billion in damages, but thanks to insurance coverage, property owners will be able to recover more easily. While cutting greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to climate impacts is crucial, it is clear that these measures are not enough to avoid significant losses and damages in many vulnerable countries.

1) Make loss and damage finance a standing agenda item in formal negotiations.

On day one of the COP27 summit, developed nations must answer the call of the G77 — a bloc of 134 developing countries currently chaired by Pakistan — and shift from “listening mode” into action mode.

While developed nations have agreed through the U.N.’s Santiago Network to provide technical support to developing countries for addressing loss and damage, last year at COP26, wealthy nations rejected the proposal for a loss and damage finance mechanism. Instead, they agreed to a two-year dialogue ending in 2024 to discuss possible funding arrangements. These are informal sessions with no decision-making authority. Adopting loss and damage finance arrangements as a formal agenda item at COP27 in Egypt can help reach consensus on solutions.

Encouragingly Frans Timmerman, the EU’s leading climate negotiator, has already signaled support for a “formal space on the agenda to discuss this challenge.” Similarly, U.S. Special Climate Envoy John Kerry has indicated that the U.S. is determined to make progress. It remains to be seen what the agreed formulation of this agenda item will be, and those details will matter. One thing is certain: If funding on loss and damage doesn’t get on the formal agenda, the climate summit could be derailed right from the start.

2) Developed nations must move on from the old narrative of liability and compensation and step up finance in solidarity with vulnerable nations.

Wealthy nations have long pushed back on the notion of providing finance for loss and damage, arguing that it may be construed as an obligation for liability and compensation. However, at the U.N. climate summit in Paris in 2015, countries agreed through the Paris Agreement decision that loss and damage does not involve liability and compensation. Progress on finance for loss and damage should not be held back at COP27 by an already-settled debate.

Developed countries should provide funds for addressing losses and damages not because of legal liability, but because supporting vulnerable countries is the right thing to do — not only for the people facing existential threats from climate change, but for the stability and security of the entire global community. In a recent interview, Dr. Saleemul Huq from the International Centre for Climate Change and Development and an ACT2025 partner said that what developing countries are asking for is “finance for loss and damage in the spirit of solidarity.”

Even if vulnerable nations all went zero-emissions tomorrow, past emissions from the G20 have locked in a high climate impacts scenario that disproportionately affects poorer nations. G20 countries represent about 10% of all countries but emit 75% of the world's greenhouse gases. In comparison, sub-Saharan Africa represents 25.5% of all countries, but only contributes 4.7% of emissions.

Furthermore, countries have vastly different capacities for mitigation and mobilizing finance, and global finances are incredibly skewed toward the richer, more powerful nations. When coupled with the existing debt crises in many vulnerable countries, large sums of losses and damages will likely push them into a severe financial crunch. We need solidarity to help address this critical challenge.

3) Countries must launch a process at COP27 to identify and establish funding arrangements at COP28 in 2023.

The most pressing steps for negotiators involve identifying where and for what financing is most needed, and how to quickly mobilize the necessary funds. Negotiators will need to examine whether existing finance channels such as the Green Climate Fund and Global Environment Facility can help, assess how a new dedicated financing mechanism could complement them, and explore new and innovative pathways for financing. One idea: U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres called on developed countries to tax the windfall profits of oil and gas companies and redirect some of those revenues to recovery efforts in nations affected by climate disasters.

Countries should apply lessons learned from funds and institutions established under the UNFCCC, including the Green Climate Fund and the Adaptation Fund.

Outside of the UNFCCC process, the past year has seen several promising new initiatives — including Denmark’s loss and damage finance pledge, the V20’s new funding program under its multi-donor trust fund, Germany’s G7 proposal on the Global Shield against Climate Risks, and Scotland’s continued push for loss and damage finance (on the heels of its own $2.2-million commitment). These efforts are welcomed and inspiring, but they should not detract from the need for a broader multilateral funding approach that prioritizes public sources of funding for addressing loss and damage.

COP27 should kickstart a timebound decision-making process for formalizing funding arrangements for responding to loss and damage under the UNFCCC, while ensuring coherence with the larger landscape of financing outside the UNFCCC.

No More Delay in Financing Loss and Damage

The number one litmus test for the success of COP27 negotiations is progress on mobilizing finance for addressing loss and damage. Further delay is indefensible — not only would it be a major loss for COP27, but the fallout would be felt in vulnerable nations and communities for years to come.

It’s time to stop avoiding the realities of the current global climate crisis. Loss and damage is the third pillar to addressing climate change, alongside curbing emissions and adapting to impacts. COP27 is an opportunity for all countries to act on that reality.

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/insights/cop27-loss-damage-finance?utm_campaign=wridigest&utm_source=wridigest-2022-11-02&utm_medium=email

Financing Low Carbon, Resilient and Inclusive Cities Through Multi-Level Governance
This event will bring together experts and practitioners to discuss and share examples of how to effectively finance low carbon, resilient and inclusive cities through multi-level action.

Financing Low Carbon, Resilient and Inclusive Cities Through Multi-Level Governance

by World Resources Institute (WRI) |  -  | Multi-level Action Pavilion, Blue Zone at COP27

Join via Zoom (passcode: 7664)

Description

Cities already account for 70% of global CO2 emissions from energy use; left unaddressed, emissions will continue to rise as urbanization accelerates, especially in developing countries. Cities are also at the forefront of climate change vulnerability: 70% of cities are already experiencing harmful impacts to their citizens and infrastructure as a result of climate change.

Cities are not only critical to delivering a green and just transition while limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees, they also offer an enormous economic opportunity. Research has shown that a bundle of technically feasible low-carbon measures could cut emissions from buildings, transport, materials use and waste in cities by almost 90% by 2050; support 45 million jobs in 2050, and generate energy and material savings worth US$23.9 trillion by 2050. Raising the investment required to seize this opportunity however requires collaboration. Cities, regions, national governments and investors must work together to not only increase access to finance but also target it innovatively and strategically.

Speakers

  • Ani Dasgupta, President & CEO, WRI
  • Governor Samuel Garcia, Nuevo León, Mexico
  • Lord Mayor Lowe of Banjul, the Gambia, Vice Chair of the Global Parliament of Mayors
  • Dr. Barbara Buchner, Global Managing Director, Climate Policy Initiative
  • Sheela Patel, Founder and Director, Society for the Promotion of Area Resource Centres (SPARC) India
  • Joseph Muturi, Chair of the Board, Slum Dwellers International
  • Graham Watkins, Chief of the Climate Change and Sustainability Division, Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

Cover image by: Shutterstock/HandmadePictures

Primary Contact: Pandora Batra, Strategic Engagement Manager, Climate Program / WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/events/2022/11/financing-low-carbon-resilient-and-inclusive-cities-through-multi-level-governance

Clean Air Catalyst: A Multi-Level Approach to Accelerating Clean Air and Climate Action

This session highlights the importance of integrated objectives and collaboration in the Clean Air Catalyst, a global partnership launched by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) in 2020, led by World Resources Institute and Environmental Defense Fund. Representatives from the partnership and three pilot cities will share their approach to scaling up a multi-city program to accelerate locally tailored solutions to air pollution that also tackle climate change, improve human health and address gender and income inequality.

Clean Air Catalyst: A Multi-Level Approach to Accelerating Clean Air and Climate Action

 -  | Multi-level Action Pavilion, Blue Zone at COP27 | Livestream available

Link to Zoom session (passcode: 454971)

Speakers

  • Genevieve Maricle, Senior Advisor, Climate and Environment, USAID 
  • Pratibha Pal, Indore Municipal Commissioner (virtual)
  • H.E Sakaja Arthur Johnson, Governor of Nairobi City County (TBC)
  • John Kioli, Chairman Kenya Climate Change Working Group and Executive Director Green Africa Foundation
  • Sarah Vogel, Senior VP of Health, Environmental Defense Fund (virtual)
  • Koni Samadhi, WRI Indonesia Country Director
  • Michael Doust, World Resources Institute 

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/events/2022/11/clean-air-catalyst-multi-level-approach-accelerating-clean-air-and-climate-action

Equity and Climate Solutions in Cities: Accelerating Actions by Key Actors

This event, in partnership with Slum Dwellers International and Mahila Housing Trust, will demonstrate how national, state, city/metropolitan governments, civil society and the private sector can collaborate to make cities around the world more equitable and sustainable. It will highlight strategies to tackle inequities and climate jointly in cities by focusing on urban infrastructure and service delivery in the areas of land and housing, water, sanitation, transportation, and energy.

Equity and Climate Solutions in Cities: Accelerating Actions by Key Actors

by World Resources Institute (WRI)

 -  | Multi-level Action Pavilion, Blue Zone, Livestream available

Livestream link (passcode: 488635)

WRI will launch a handy guidance document on how these key actors can center equity in climate mitigation and adaptation actions involving these key urban services that affect people's lives. The guidance is based on WRI's flagship report, Seven Transformations for More Equitable and Sustainable Cities, launched just before COP26.

Speakers:

  • Ani Dasgupta, President & CEO, World Resources Institute
  • Luis Donaldo Colosio, Mayor of Monterrey, Mexico
  • Frannie Léautier, CEO of Southbridge Investments
  • Joseph Muturi, Chair of Slum Dwellers International
  • Bijal Brahmbhatt, Director, Mahila Housing SEWA Trust
  • Carlos Lopes, Professor, Mandela School of Public Governance, University of Cape Town

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/events/2022/11/equity-and-climate-solutions-cities-accelerating-actions-key-actors

Primary Contact: Anjali Mahenda, Director of Global Research, WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities

Blended Finance Solutions and Multi-stakeholder Partnerships to Scale Water Resilience
The session will spotlight real-life examples of projects and outcomes achieved through partnerships between financing initiatives - elevating water resilience as a policy and investment priority in subnational, national, regional, and international development and climate agendas for increased and scaled action.

Blended Finance Solutions and Multi-stakeholder Partnerships to Scale Water Resilience

Webinar by World Resources Institute (WRI) |  -  | Water Pavilion at COP27, Livestream available

Of the $100 billion in private investment towards water since 1990 only 1% has been received in sub-Saharan Africa. Addressing water-related needs, stresses, and shocks in a manner that is low-carbon and sustainable is therefore the biggest investment opportunity that will underpin all other development in the continent and across the globe.

Hosted at the Water Climate Pavilion Finance Day (co-curated with ADB & AfDB) this session will showcase several initiatives and partnerships that are blending public and private investment and know-how to accelerate investment in high-impact water resilience solutions – including the ACWA Fund & Platform.

Moderators

  • Ede Ijjasz, former Regional Director, World Bank
  • Smita Rawoot, World Resources Institute

Speakers

  • Ms. Stientje van Veldhoven, World Resources Institute
  • Jochen Renger, GIZ
  • Kathryn Pharr, WaterAid
  • Martin Shouler, Arup
  • Binayak Das, Water Integrity Network
  • Yasmine Abdel-Maksoud, American University in Cairo
  • David Ramos, HSBC
  • Nick O'Donohoe, British International Investment
  • Rami Ghandour, Metito
  • Colin McQuistan, Practical Action

Register to watch the livestream

Image by: jcomp/FreePik

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/events/2022/11/blended-finance-solutions-and-multi-stakeholder-partnerships-scale-water-resilience

National Systems for Adaptation Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning: A Country Dialogue
In this 90-minute session, the Adaptation Action Coalition (AAC) secretariat will facilitate a multi-stakeholder dialogue focusing on national systems for adaptation.

National Systems for Adaptation Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning (MEL): A Country Dialogue

25 October 2022 from 8-9:30am EDT

The global adaptation community is focused on establishing methods for tracking progress on adaptation through mechanisms such as the Glasgow-Sharma-el-Sheikh work program on the Global Goal on Adaptation (GGA). However, few countries have fully operationalized national-level monitoring, evaluation and learning (MEL) adaptation frameworks. Recent research from WRI analyzing the adaptation components of nationally determined contributions (NDCs) finds that less than a quarter of countries refer to adaptation MEL approaches in their updated NDCs.

Given this gap, dedicated resources and tools for developing adaptation MEL systems are in high demand. Developing countries have commonly asserted their need for support, technical assistance and financial resources for developing robust MEL frameworks needed to validate, learn from and enhance existing adaptation actions and plans.

In this 90-minute session, the Adaptation Action Coalition (AAC) secretariat will facilitate a multi-stakeholder dialogue focusing on national systems for adaptation MEL and highlight:

  • Perspective of countries in terms of progress, challenges and opportunities in tracking and evaluating adaptation

  • Insights from intermediary organizations with experience in supporting countries to build MEL systems 

  • Outstanding gaps and challenges in developing and implementing such systems

  • Discussion on potential avenues of action to drive progress on adaptation MEL globally.

Moderator:

  • Rebecca CarterHead of AAC Secretariat; Acting Director, Climate Resilience Practice, World Resources Institute

Speakers:

  • Rohini Kohli, Lead Technical Specialist for National Adaptation Plans, United Nations Development Program

  • Emilie BeauchampLead, Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning for Adaptation to Climate Change, NAP Global Network

  • Ryan O'ConnorResearch Analyst, World Resources Institute

  • AAC Member Country Representative (TBC)

The Adaptation Action Coalition is a state-led coalition of 40 countries accelerating global action on adaptation to achieve a climate-resilient world. Learn more: www.wri.org/initiatives/adaptation-action-coalition.

Register here: https://www.wri.org/events/2022/10/national-systems-adaptation-mel-country-dialogue

Primary Contact: Kiyomi de Zoysa, Engagement and Communications Specialist, Climate Resilience Practice