City2City
UN-Habitat's Cities Investment Facility is inviting urban development proposals to join its pipeline
The Cities Investment Facility (CIF) invites governments and urban project developers to submit investable urban development projects to join the CIF pipeline, with selected projects to be showcased at the 11th Session of the World Urban Forum (WUF11) in 2022.  

Cities Investment Facility (CIF): UN-Habitat's Sustainable Urban Development Project Pipeline & Preparation Facility

CIF is a multi-stakeholder initiative centered around unlocking greater capital flows to urban impact projects, by supporting their processes of ideation, design, financing, and implementation, using a series of partnership-based instruments.

For further information regarding CIF and its pipeline, please find the details in the attached brochure and, on the CIF website, - http://citiesinvestmentfacility.org/

Selected projects will actively participate in all 3 pillars of CIF in the following ways: 

  • Projects will be showcased on the Cities Investment Portal (CI Portal), which allows city officials to reach out to a global audience of investors and access a community of stakeholders at the ideation stage.
  • Projects will work with the Cities Investment Advisory Platform (CIAP), an initiative providing advisory services on upstream project preparation, bankability, and SDG-impact.
  • Projects will access the Cities Investment Vehicles (CI Vehicles), which are brokers or funds that provide diverse and blended sources of capital to enable cities to begin implementing their projects.

Governments (National/State/Local), project promoters and developers working on public infrastructure projects, UN Regional offices, and key CIF focal points around the world are also invited to submit sustainable urban infrastructure projects for consideration in this call.

Please be advised that the proposals received between September 7th and October 8th, 2021 11:59 PM East Africa Time (EAT) - UTC+3:00 would be considered for the CIF Pipeline. All details regarding the open call, including eligibility, next steps, the project selection criteria, and the project submission form can be found at this link.

If you have any additional queries, please email us at unhabitat-cip@un.org.

SDG Moment 2021

SDG Moment 2021

The Sustainable Development Goals are a blueprint for fighting poverty and hunger, confronting the climate crisis, achieving gender equality and much more, within the next ten years. At a time of great uncertainty, the SDGs show the way forward to a strong recovery from COVID-19 and a better future for all on a safe and healthy planet.

Overview

Convened by the UN Secretary-General, the second SDG Moment of the Decade of Action will be held virtually on Monday, 20 September 2021 from 9 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

Background Note | Full Programme

Objectives

As the world is grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic and major challenges to progress across the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, the SDG Moment will seek to: 

  1. Reinforce the continued relevance of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and build momentum in advance of major summits and intergovernmental meetings.   
  2. Highlight urgent actions needed to ensure COVID-19 response and recovery efforts are equitable, inclusive and accelerate the transition to sustainable development.   
  3. Demonstrate that transformative change at scale is possible between now and 2030.  

The meeting will convene leaders from over 30 Member States as well as champions for the SDGs from civil society, the private sector and international partners. It will be accessible to everyone, everywhere through UN media channels including:

Stay tuned for announcements on speakers and special guests over the coming weeks here: https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sdg-moment/

More Inclusive Food Systems And Innovative SMEs Take Center Stage At UN Food Systems Pre-Summit
Advancing a policy framework and innovative solutions to improve access to healthy and sustainable food will require multi-sectoral engagement. This is becoming the key takeaway from the UN Food Systems Pre-Summit, taking place in Rome.

More Inclusive Food Systems And Innovative SMEs Take Center Stage At UN Food Systems Pre-Summit

by Daniela De Lorenzo | Forbes | Posted on 27 July 2021

Launched by UN Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres in October 2019, on World Food Day, the UN Food System Summit aims to address food security and sustainable and equitable food production. The meeting sets the premises of the global event in September by bringing together diverse actors to leverage the power of food systems to deliver progress on all 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Success will however require engagement from all stakeholders: from nations to farmers, from companies to consumers.

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the most pressing challenges of the world's food systems. The agricultural commodity price index has increased by 30%, compared to January 2020, and it reached the highest level in eight years. During the past few days, speakers tackled issues including the need for greater recognition of land tenure rights, the right of indigenous peoples, the links between humanitarian and development sectors, and gender-responsive food systems.

Locally sourced game-changing solutions

Mobilizing public and private investments to drive food systems transformation and prioritizing game-changing solutions should lay on collective action, according to a coalition made of EATIDEOThought For Food and The Rockefeller Foundation. Earlier in March, the parties launched The Food Systems Game Changers Lab, aiming to discover and support ideas, enterprises and initiatives that have the potential to transform our world’s food systems. During the opening day of the Pre-Summit of the UN Food Systems Summit on July 26, the coalition urged strengthening a multi-sectoral approach for food systems transformation if we want to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

The Food Systems Game Changers Lab is based on the approach to democratizing food systems: “Systems change demands a new approach: new minds working together in brave ways to build the resilient and inclusive world that we need,” stated Christine Gould, founder of the Millennial and Gen Z-focused agrifood innovation network Thought For Food, and a member of the UN Food Systems Summit Advisory Committee. 

The team received over 500 submissions from 85 countries: these ideas ranged from building regenerative farms in various regions to supporting indigenous farming and food ways to combat climate change and improve diets. It will however require increasing resources: “We have seen that investments in research and innovation will need to double, if we have to halt the climate and food crisis by 2030,” said Kundhavi Kadiresan, managing director and global engagement and innovation at CGIAR. “Leveraging these investments to support the long term collaboration with diverse stakeholders on the ground, and looking at co-created with local partners is part of our strategy,” she continued. 

The role of SMEs

Similarly, the UN announced the 50 best Small Business Winners, SMEs providing “Good Food for All,” which will share a $100,000 cash prize“Small businesses manage at least half of our food economies and kept food on our plates throughout the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Dr Agnes Kalibata, special envoy of the UN Secretary-General for the 2021 Food Systems Summit. “We must understand the challenges they face and work together to ensure they remain at the heart of efforts to improve the future of food,” she continued. The competition winners were announced alongside a new report, outlining three critical pathways for supporting small businesses in realizing their full potential and contribution to tackling the climate crisis. Creating more conducive business environments, offering more positive incentives, and empowering small business leaders to have greater influence in sector planning will be central. Companies, investors and authorities will have a key role in accelerating these businesses and initiatives to help scaling up further.

Follow Daniela De Lorenzo on Twitter or LinkedIn or check out her website

Retrieved from https://www.forbes.com/sites/danieladelorenzo/2021/07/27/more-inclusive-food-systems-and-innovative-smes-take-center-stage-at-un-food-systems-pre-summit/?sh=7641f6d70cc5

Photo by Eric Lafforgue/Art in All of Us/Corbis via Getty Images

United Nations Food Systems Summit 2021

Under the leadership of UN Secretary-General António Guterres, the UN Food Systems Summit will take place on Thursday, 23 September 2021. It will be a completely virtual event during the UN General Assembly High-level Week.

United Nations Food Systems Summit 2021

Details: 23 September 2021 | 09:00 to 18:00 EDT | New York - Virtual

Under the leadership of UN Secretary-General António Guterres, the UN Food Systems Summit will take place on Thursday, 23 September 2021. It will be a completely virtual event during the UN General Assembly High-level Week.

The UN Food Systems Summit will serve as a historic opportunity to empower all people to leverage the power of food systems to drive our recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic and get us back on track to achieve all 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

Over the past 18 months, the Summit has brought together all UN Member States and constituencies around the world – including thousands of youth, food producers, Indigenous Peoples, civil society, researchers, private sector, and the UN system – to bring about tangible, positive changes to the world’s food systems. As a people’s summit and a solutions summit, it has recognized that everyone, everywhere must take action and work together to transform the way the world produces, consumes, and thinks about food.

The Summit will culminate this inclusive global process, offering a catalytic moment for public mobilization and actionable commitments by heads of state and government and other constituency leaders to take this agenda forward. 

Through this people’s summit, the UN will reaffirm its commitment to promote human rights for all and ensure everyone, everywhere has the opportunity to participate. The event is open to all through its virtual programme and platform.

Join us at this event alongside leaders, experts and stakeholders from around the world. Together we can and must leverage the power of our food systems to achieve all of our shared goals for people, planet, and prosperity.

Note: Participants who registered for the Pre-Summit virtual platform in July do not need to register again for the Summit, as their existing profile will enable them continued access to the platform. If you have forgotten your login details or need to reset your password please visit our password reset page.

Register and read the guidance note here: https://www.un.org/en/food-systems-summit/summit

Join the #FoodSystems4SDGs countdown to the Summit

Photo: Debdatta Chakraborty ©. Floating Island Vegetables, India - a winner of the Good Food For All photo competition.

Approaching Urban Waste Management Through a Resilience Lens
Approaching waste management from a resilience perspective – understood as the capacity of a city’s systems, businesses, institutions, communities, and individuals to survive, adapt, and grow no matter what chronic stresses and acute shocks they experience – can support decision-makers in balancing the negative and the positive impacts of their waste management system. 

Approaching Urban Waste Management Through a Resilience Lens

by Resilient Cities Network 

Cities are home to over half of the global population and account for nearly three quarters of global greenhouse gas emissions, which means no climate target can be met without a deep transformation of urban centers across the globe towards a more inclusive, sustainable and, ultimately, resilient path. Accordingly, the recently published IPCC Report on Climate Change 2021: the Physical Sciences Basis has described unprecedented changes all over the world regarding the whole climate system, and how cities can intensify human induced warming, increasing the risks of rising water levels, droughts, and other disasters. It is estimated that without urgent action, particularly in cities, these climate impacts could push an additional 100 million people into poverty by 2030, according to the World Bank. It is clear that rapid urbanization, climate change and globalization have helped unfold and shape vulnerabilities globally, shedding light on the interrelated challenges of environmental, social, and economic inequalities.  

To break down the complexity of these interconnected challenges, we take a deep dive on urban waste management systems. Historically, waste management has been a key concern for local authorities, particularly because of its health and environmental implications. Today, there is an understanding that waste management is a systemic challenge with numerous implications, including economic development, social and economic inequalities, community engagement, marine pollution, and many other aspects that shape the urban ecosystem. These implications are constantly evolving, according to the World Bank report What a Waste 2.0: A Global Snapshot of Solid Waste Management to 2050, cities have limited adequate and suitable systems to cope with changes in the waste disposed. Therefore, Resilient Cities Network, as part of the Urban Ocean Program, has selected case studies from the participating cities that highlight the diversity of city solutions to waste management that incorporates a resilience perspective and yields multiple benefits to the urban system as a whole. 

Why Chose a Resilience Lens

Approaching waste management from a resilience perspective – understood as the capacity of a city’s systems, businesses, institutions, communities, and individuals to survive, adapt, and grow no matter what chronic stresses and acute shocks they experience – can support decision-makers in balancing the negative and the positive impacts of their waste management system. City stakeholders often underestimate the negative impact of mismanaged waste. For instance, plastic waste blocking waterways increases the intensity of flooding, which, in turn, may spread waterborne diseases and/or lead to landslides in already disaster-prone areas. Another example is the harmful toxins coming from waste incineration that can increase air pollution and decrease health prospects for the population. These negative consequences are usually not taken into consideration when developing waste management programs. 

It demonstrates how, at the same time, an inadequate waste management system can contribute to deepening inequalities and vulnerabilities of urban communities and economies while exacerbating the risks from shocks and stresses the city faces.  Building systems that integrate flexibility and inclusiveness can strengthen the city’s response when facing a disruption. For instance, recently, the Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated plastic pollution mostly because of delivery packaging and personal protective equipment, such as masks and plastic gloves. However, some cities have prompted their citizens, businesses, and governments to find alternative materials, increased recycling capacity, etc. It demonstrates the limitations and possibilities of interconnected systems. The pandemic has also reinforced the necessity to leverage resources and investments to produce multiple benefits, enhancing the city’s capacity to face risks and overcome long-lasting challenges. 

How to Bring a Resilience Lens

The Resilient Cities Network, as part of the Urban Ocean Program, has selected seven case studies that demonstrate how waste management solutions can support cities in building resilience. These case studies show the breadth of drivers of a resilient waste management system: from bolstering the rights of informal waste workers, educating youth on the 3R concept and community waste banks to optimizing collection systems, reducing food waste, and promoting eco-friendly packaging materials. While none of these initiatives should be seen as a standalone, silver bullet solution to resilient waste management, each makes an important contribution to the broader system. Addressing waste management not only solves pollution or plastic leakage issues but also creates valuable co-benefits for cities in terms of climate, health, jobs, and many other aspects. Therefore, we have documented three preliminary best practices for building resilience through local waste management actions:

Leveraging local knowledge 

Recognizing the importance of the local context and knowledge is key for building resilience. For instance, Con Son has understood its identity and potential as an ecotourism destination and developed a program to reintroduce natural local products as packaging material. Building on citizens’ engagement and understanding of the local possibilities, the program provided a platform for them to test ideas and businesses that used local products as alternatives to plastic. Market penetration and product acceptance have higher chances of success when citizens are engaged, and local knowledge is leveraged. At the same time, in Semarang, the waste banks are community-driven solutions for enhancing 3R practices and increasing the financial value of recycling. Building on a very local scale, these banks are rooted in community engagement and understanding local needs. 

Leveraging partnerships

The waste management system is complex; therefore, solutions are also complex and require multiple stakeholders. For instance, Toyama has developed an 18-hectare Eco-Town, an industrial park that includes seven waste-to-useable private companies, with the support of the national government. The Eco-Town program helps to create a more recycling-oriented society and showcase new recycling technologies. This was only possible with the support of the national government and engagement with the private sector. At the same time, Milan has developed a Food Policy in which it aims to improve the food system while reducing waste, tackling climate change, and supporting its planning capacity. One of the key pilots was developed together with academic partners, supermarkets, businesses, and company canteens to collect and redistribute food waste at the community level. Finally, the innovative pro-poor public-private partnership in Pune, the SWaCH, has strengthened the position of informal workers and integrated them into the cooperative, creating a more sustainable and efficient solid waste management system.

Leveraging infrastructure

Adequate infrastructure is key to any waste management system, but it can also promote benefits beyond quality and efficiency. For instance, in Panamá City, an NGO called Marea Verde has deployed a trash trap in one of the most contaminated rivers while addressing gender and technological gaps in the communities living along the river. The City of Rotterdam has developed an underground container system serving as a temporary waste storage facility until collection to improve the health conditions of the waste workers and enhance the quality of the city’s public spaces. 

For more information on the Urban Ocean Program, as well as these seven select case studies visit our webpage

Article and image retrieved from https://resilientcitiesnetwork.org/urban_resiliences/approaching-urban-waste-management/

Global Green Growth Week 2021

Global Green Growth Week 2021 (GGGWeek2021) - Green Recovery, Green Jobs, and NetZero2050

SAVE THE DATE & CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS

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strong>Dates: Oct. 25 – 27, 2021 (Virtual Conference) | GGGWeek2021 is hosted by the Global Green Growth Institute.

About GGGWeek2021

  • GGGWeek2021 will feature high-level panel discussions, keynote speeches, interactive sessions, and debates that will highlight examples of solutions and best practices to green COVID-19 recovery, develop Green New Deals to accelerate the implementation of the Paris Agreement, engage with global green growth leaders and practitioners, forge partnerships, and provide participants with learning and sharing opportunities across a range of sectors and topics to advance the global efforts to build back better.
GGGWeek2021 at a Glance
  • * Day 1 ~ 3 (Oct. 25 ~ 27, 2021)
    High-level keynote speeches, presentations, panel discussions and debates on topics related to Green New Deals, Green Recovery, Green Investments, Innovative financing mechanisms, Private sector engagement for scaling up, Nature-based Solutions, Adaptation and resilience building, Climate-smart agriculture, Sustainable green industrial parks, Carbon pricing, NDCs/LEDS/MRV, Blue economy & coastal resilience, Sustainable forests, Green cities, Sustainable transport, Circular economy & waste management, Green industries, Scaling-up renewable energy, Techno-climate innovation, Green entrepreneurship, Public-Private Partnerships.

  • * Day 4 (Oct. 28, 2021)
    GGGI’s Tenth Session of the Assembly and Fourteenth Session of the Council (Joint Session)

Call for presentations

  • With building back better for a green recovery and achieving net zero 2050 at the top of the international agenda, and the urgent need to translate the net zero pledges into ambitious NDC commitments for 2030 and greening the massive stimulus packages, GGGI is inviting you to propose your presentation(s) in one of the GGGWeek2021 themes. The virtual GGGWeek2021 event will bring together policy makers, financiers (MDBs/private banks/institutional investors), experts, academia, civil society organizations, technology developers, representatives from various industries, and partners interested to drive the change.

  • To submit your proposition of presentation, please complete the form at Microsoft Forms (LINK)  or download the form (Link) to briefly introduce your topic by August 31, 2021. We look forward to welcoming you at GGGWeek2021 and having you showcase your experience.

  • For questions, please reach out to GGGWeek2021@gggi.org.

Learn more here: https://gggi.org/global-green-growth-week-2021/

Download the official invitation here: https://gggi.org/site/assets/uploads/2021/06/GGGWeek2021_SavetheDate_20210630.pdf

The 16th Annual Session of Global Forum on Human Settlements & Sustainable Cities And Human Settlements Awards Ceremony (GFHS 2021)
The 16th Annual Session of Global Forum on Human Settlements (GFHS 2021) - one of the most important events focusing on sustainable cities and human settlements - will be taking place from October 27 to 29 as an observance of “World Cities Day”, with the theme being “Accelerate Green Transformation and Innovation towards Healthy, Resilient and Carbon-neutral Cities”.

The 16th Annual Session of Global Forum on Human Settlements & Sustainable Cities And Human Settlements Awards Ceremony (GFHS 2021)

  • Theme: Accelerate Green Transformation and Innovation towards Healthy, Resilient, and Carbon-neutral Cities
  • Dates: 27-29 October 2021
  • Format: Online Forum+ Live Streaming
  • Register here: http://gfhsforum.mikecrm.com/pkgIUTe

BACKGROUND

The UN Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres, stressed at the One Planet Summit that “2021 must be the year to reconcile humanity with nature”. “We begin a new year under the sign of hope." 2021 is a crucial year for implementing the "2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development" and accelerating carbon-neutral actions at both local and national levels.

Against this background, the 16th Annual Session of Global Forum on Human Settlements (GFHS 2021) - one of the most important events focusing on sustainable cities and human settlements - will be taking place from October 27 to 29 as an observance of “World Cities Day”, with the theme being “Accelerate Green Transformation and Innovation towards Healthy, Resilient and Carbon-neutral Cities”.

The forum will be organized in a format combining online and offline participation, to address how cities can use green recovery as a golden opportunity to kick-start a green transformation and drive innovation at all levels and across all sectors, thus enhancing urban safety, resilience and inclusiveness, boosting green growth, and achieving coordinated, healthy, and high-quality sustainable urban development.

Dignitaries from numerous countries, senior officials from the UN and concerned international organizations, green city mayors, business leaders, and well-known experts and scholars will be giving keynote speeches and joining thematic discussions. Webcasting and simultaneous translation between Chinese and English will be available to foster interactive dialogues with stakeholders across the globe, and it is expected to reach out to approximately a hundred thousand interested persons.

OBJECTIVES

  1. To facilitate effective conversation and action: The forum aims to provide a valuable global platform for high-level dialogue and for sharing innovative approaches, strategies, technologies, and successful experiences on green recovery and transition.
  2. To strengthen urban safety, inclusiveness, and resilience: The forum seeks to offer practical solutions to how healthy, resilient and carbon-neutral cities should be planned, designed, financed, developed, governed and managed, so as to enhance safety, resilience, inclusiveness, and sustainability in diverse urban systems.
  3. To foster partnership on sustainable development: The forum is designed to strengthen capacity building, cultivate new type partnerships, foster urban innovation, accelerate effective actions, and drive progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, the New Urban Agenda, and Paris Agreement.
  4. To highlight best practices: the forum is expected to recommend a batch of best practices that can serve as role models on green transformation and innovation and sustainable urban development.

KEY ISSUES

  • Healthy, smart, and resilient cities and communities
  • Renewable energy systems and carbon-neutral cities
  • Circular economy and zero-waste cities
  • Nature-based solutions for climate-resilient cities
  • A sustainable blue economy to support the green transformation of cities
  • Urban hydrology and integrated water resources management
  • Green financing for carbon-neutral cities
  • International Green Model City Initiative: creating global pilot demonstration areas of carbon neutrality
  • Blockchain technology and smart city governance
  • World hemp investment and sustainable development
  • Towards future-proof buildings and neighbourhoods
  • Pursuing a resilient, inclusive, gender-equal, and green economic recovery

CO-ORGANIZERS

  • Global Forum on Human Settlements (GFHS)
  • World Meteorological Organization (WMO)
  • United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)
  • United Nations Centre for Regional Development (UNCRD)
  • Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI)
  • World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

IN COLLABORATION WITH

  • United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
  • UN Economic and Social Commission in Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) (tbc)
  • UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA)
  • United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR)
  • United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (UNCBD) (tbc)
  • Asian Development Bank (ADB) African Development Bank (AfDB)
  • UNEP Finance Initiative (UNEP-FI)
  • Swedish Energy Agency (SEA)
  • International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) (tbc)
  • International Ocean Institute (IOI) International Science Council (ISC)
  • International Initiative for a Sustainable Built Environment (iiSBE)
  • Architecture 2030 Habitat For Humanity International (HFHI)
  • Global One Belt One Road Association (GOBA)
  • World Ocean Council (WOC) Universal Peace Federation (UPF)
  • World Association of Non-Governmental Organizations (WANGO)

Learn more here: http://www.gfhsforum.org/Events

People-Smart Sustainable Cities: Sustainable and Smart Cities for all Ages
The publication highlights that the COVID-19 pandemic has shown that different cities have different capacities to cope with crises. Both the pandemic and the economic crisis caused by lockdown measures have disproportionally affected different cities as well as different groups of the population; the most vulnerable groups of society have suffered the most.

People-Smart Sustainable Cities: Sustainable and Smart Cities for all Ages

by United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) | Published in April 2021

Cities possess massive resources, talent, and creativity and serve as hubs for knowledge sharing, experimentation, and innovation, generating new ideas, embedding these solutions locally, and scaling up successful practices.

Cities, however, are not abstract sustainability-making machines; they are places where real people live, work, study and flourish. Cities are made of people, by people, and for people. Sustainable measures will have to make sense to inhabitants of cities, making their life more liveable. Furthermore, it is people who drive sustainability and who are its ultimate source and beneficiaries. This vision underpins the notion of people-smart sustainable cities, introduced in this publication.

Download this publication

The Circulate Initiative’s Annual Report 2020
The Circulate Initiative has released its 2020 Annual Report providing an update on its full year progress, accomplishments and outlook for 2021. Despite the challenges of 2020, we continued to support innovators to source, support and scale effective solutions that end plastic leakage into the ocean, especially through the work of The Incubation Network and Urban Ocean.

The Circulate Initiative’s Annual Report 2020

Published in July 2021

There is an estimated 150 million tons of plastic waste in the ocean today, with another 8 million tons added annually. Research by Ocean Conservancy estimates that a 45% reduction in plastic leakage is possible by investing in waste collection and recycling systems in just 5 countries in Asia. However, several factors are hindering the development of inclusive, sustainable and investible waste management and recycling supply chains in South and Southeast Asia: 

  • Lack of capital
  • Shortage of investible ventures 
  • Underdeveloped value chains 
  • Complex policy and regulatory frameworks 
  • Lack of public awareness and participation

The ecosystem of actors working to address this problem needs access to better knowledge and tools to guide decision-making and investment. The Circulate Initiative is working to fill this gap through the incubation of investible and inclusive solutions, and the generation of insights that help to end the plastic pollution crisis and to advance the circular economy.

The Circulate Initiative has released its 2020 Annual Report providing an update on its full-year progress, accomplishments, and outlook for 2021. Despite the challenges of 2020, we continued to support innovators to source, support, and scale effective solutions that end plastic leakage into the ocean, especially through the work of The Incubation Network and Urban Ocean.  

We also leveraged our expertise and network of strategic partners to develop insights on the emerging landscape of plastics claims and credits to help brands, investors and others better evaluate the impact potential and role of these new schemes in the fight to prevent plastic leakage into the environment.

Read the report here: https://d5f869f1-4310-4939-88bb-9d398556b445.filesusr.com/ugd/77554d_091ac9c0ab7d420988c67653944e07bc.pdf

Learn more about The Circulate Initiative here: https://www.thecirculateinitiative.org/

Webinar: Urban Ocean Circularity Assessment Protocol Report Findings
We are pleased to announce the release of Urban Ocean's first city cohort’s Circularity Assessment Protocol (CAP) report findings! Conducted by the Circularity Informatics Lab at the University of Georgia, the CAP is a standardized assessment to inform decision-makers through collecting community-level data on plastic usage and management. This panel session will present the CAP findings from the first five Urban Ocean cities: Can Tho, Vietnam; Melaka, Malaysia; Panama City, Panama; Pune, India; and Semarang, Indonesia. 

Webinar: Urban Ocean Circularity Assessment Protocol Report Findings

Date and Time: Wednesday, 31 August 2021 - 08.00 AM EST / 12:00 PM GMT / 08.00 PM Singapore Time

We are pleased to announce the release of Urban Ocean's first city cohort’s Circularity Assessment Protocol (CAP) report findings! Conducted by the Circularity Informatics Lab at the University of Georgia, the CAP is a standardized assessment to inform decision-makers through collecting community-level data on plastic usage and management. The CAP results provide baseline data for Resilient Cities Network’s Opportunity Assessment Tool, which represents Stage 2 of Urban Ocean. This comprehensive Gap Assessment allows participating cities to map challenges, risks, and vulnerabilities within their critical waste management systems.

This panel session will present the CAP findings from the first five Urban Ocean cities: Can Tho, Vietnam; Melaka, Malaysia; Panama City, Panama; Pune, India; and Semarang, Indonesia. This includes comparative information across the cities related to formal and informal waste management, product use and availability, consumer perspectives, waste leakage, and opportunities to build circular economy practices.

The panel will consist of researchers from the Circularity Informatics Lab, partners from Urban Ocean, as well as a local implementing partner, and a city representative from Pune, India, to share their perspectives.

Register here

Urban Ocean, a three-way cooperative partnership between Resilient Cities NetworkOcean ConservancyThe Circulate Initiative, works with city leaders to bring new ideas, partners, and resources together to solve interrelated problems around waste management. It aims to demonstrate how actions to improve waste management and recycling can provide holistic, resilient, and sustainable solutions that not only reduce ocean plastic pollution but also address key city priorities such as improving public health, promoting innovation, supporting economic development and job growth, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions through a capacity building and accelerator program for cities.

For questions, please contact: media@resilientcitiesnetwork.org