City2City
COVID-19 and Human Development: Assessing the Crisis, Envisioning the Recovery
02 July 2020 - This note takes a capabilities approach to document the severity of the unfolding human development crisis. Such an approach implies an evaluative framework to assess the crisis and shape the policy response that emphasizes the potential for people to be and do what they aspire in life as opposed to material resources or economic activity.

02 July 2020 - The COVID-19 pandemic is unleashing a human development crisis. On some dimensions of human development, conditions today are equivalent to levels of deprivation last seen in the mid-1980s.

But the crisis is hitting hard on all of human development’s constitutive elements: income (with the largest contraction in economic activity since the Great Depression), health (directly causing a death toll over 300,000 and indirectly leading potentially to an additional 6,000 child deaths every day from preventable causes over the next 6 months) and education (with effective out-of-school rates – meaning, accounting for the inability to access the internet – in primary education expected to drop to the levels of actual rates of the mid-1980s levels). This, not counting less visible indirect effects, including increased domestic violence, yet to be fully documented.

The pandemic was superimposed on unresolved tensions between people and technology, between people and the planet, between the haves and the have-nots. These tensions were already shaping a new generation of inequalities—pertaining to enhanced capabilities, the new necessities of the 21st century, as defined in the 2019 Human Development Report. But the response to the crisis can shape how those tensions are addressed and whether inequalities in human development are reduced.

This note takes a capabilities approach to document the severity of the unfolding human development crisis. Such an approach implies an evaluative framework to assess the crisis and shape the policy response that emphasizes the potential for people to be and do what they aspire in life as opposed to material resources or economic activity. To assess the crisis, the note draws from original simulations that are based on an adjusted Human Development Index—with the education dimension modified to reflect the effects of school closures and mitigation measures—and that incorporate current projections of gross national income (GNI) per capita for 2020.

The simulations suggest conditions today would correspond to a steep and unprecedented decline in human development. With almost 9 in 10 students out of school and deep recessions in most economies (including a 4 percent drop in GNI per capita worldwide), the decline in the index –reflecting a narrowing in capabilities-- would be equivalent to erasing all the progress in human development of the past six years. Importantly, if conditions in school access are restored, capabilities related to education would immediately bounce back – while the income dimension would follow the path of the economic recovery post-crisis. The simulations also show the importance of promoting equity in capabilities. In a scenario with more equitable internet access—where each country closes the gap with the leaders in its human development category—the decline in human development would be more than halved. This would be eminently affordable. In 2018 it was estimated that $100 billion would be needed to close the gap in internet access in low- and middle-income countries—or about 1 percent of the extraordinary fiscal programmes announced around the world so far.

The note suggests three principles to shape the response to the crisis:

  • Look at the response through an equity lens.i Countries, communities and groups already lagging in enhanced capabilities will be particularly affected, and leaving them further behind will have long-term impacts on human development.
  • Focus on people’s enhanced capabilities. This could reconcile apparent tradeoffs between public health and economic activity (a means to the end of expanding capabilities) but would also help build resilience for future shocks.
  • Follow a coherent multidimensional approach. Since the crisis has multiple interconnected dimensions (health, economic, and several social aspects, decisions on the allocation of fiscal resources that can either further lock-in or break free from carbon-intensive production and consumption), a systemic approach—rather than a sector-by-sector sequential approach—is essential. A recent survey conducted in 14 countries found that 71 percent of adults globally consider that climate change is as serious a crisis as COVID-19, with two-thirds supporting government actions to prioritise climate change during the recovery. ii

The United Nations has proposed a framework for the immediate socioeconomic response,iii with which this note is fully consistent and meant to inform and further flesh out both the analysis of the crisis and possible responses.

Finally, the note also highlights the importance of collective action—at the community, country, and global levels. And the response to this crisis is showing how people around the world are responding collectively. The adoption of social distancing behaviour—which in some cases started before formal policies were put in place—could not possibly be fully enforced. It depended on the voluntary cooperation of billions of people. And it was done in response to a shared global risk that brought to the fore as a priority something other than having economies grow more rapidly. If we needed proof of concept that humanity can respond collectively to a shared global challenge, we are now living through it.

Read the full report here or download the attached PDF of the report.

COVID-19 and Human Development: Assessing the Crisis, Envisioning the Recovery
02 July 2020 - This note takes a capabilities approach to document the severity of the unfolding human development crisis. Such an approach implies an evaluative framework to assess the crisis and shape the policy response that emphasizes the potential for people to be and do what they aspire in life as opposed to material resources or economic activity. 

02 July 2020 - The COVID-19 pandemic is unleashing a human development crisis. On some dimensions of human development, conditions today are equivalent to levels of deprivation last seen in the mid-1980s.

But the crisis is hitting hard on all of human development’s constitutive elements: income (with the largest contraction in economic activity since the Great Depression), health (directly causing a death toll over 300,000 and indirectly leading potentially to an additional 6,000 child deaths every day from preventable causes over the next 6 months) and education (with effective out-of-school rates – meaning, accounting for the inability to access the internet – in primary education expected to drop to the levels of actual rates of the mid-1980s levels). This, not counting less visible indirect effects, including increased domestic violence, yet to be fully documented.

The pandemic was superimposed on unresolved tensions between people and technology, between people and the planet, between the haves and the have-nots. These tensions were already shaping a new generation of inequalities—pertaining to enhanced capabilities, the new necessities of the 21st century, as defined in the 2019 Human Development Report. But the response to the crisis can shape how those tensions are addressed and whether inequalities in human development are reduced.

This note takes a capabilities approach to document the severity of the unfolding human development crisis. Such an approach implies an evaluative framework to assess the crisis and shape the policy response that emphasizes the potential for people to be and do what they aspire in life as opposed to material resources or economic activity. To assess the crisis, the note draws from original simulations that are based on an adjusted Human Development Index—with the education dimension modified to reflect the effects of school closures and mitigation measures—and that incorporate current projections of gross national income (GNI) per capita for 2020.

The simulations suggest conditions today would correspond to a steep and unprecedented decline in human development. With almost 9 in 10 students out of school and deep recessions in most economies (including a 4 percent drop in GNI per capita worldwide), the decline in the index –reflecting a narrowing in capabilities-- would be equivalent to erasing all the progress in human development of the past six years. Importantly, if conditions in school access are restored, capabilities related to education would immediately bounce back – while the income dimension would follow the path of the economic recovery post-crisis. The simulations also show the importance of promoting equity in capabilities. In a scenario with more equitable internet access—where each country closes the gap with the leaders in its human development category—the decline in human development would be more than halved. This would be eminently affordable. In 2018 it was estimated that $100 billion would be needed to close the gap in internet access in low- and middle-income countries—or about 1 percent of the extraordinary fiscal programmes announced around the world so far.

The note suggests three principles to shape the response to the crisis:

  • Look at the response through an equity lens.i Countries, communities and groups already lagging in enhanced capabilities will be particularly affected, and leaving them further behind will have long-term impacts on human development.
  • Focus on people’s enhanced capabilities. This could reconcile apparent tradeoffs between public health and economic activity (a means to the end of expanding capabilities) but would also help build resilience for future shocks.
  • Follow a coherent multidimensional approach. Since the crisis has multiple interconnected dimensions (health, economic, and several social aspects, decisions on the allocation of fiscal resources that can either further lock-in or break free from carbon-intensive production and consumption), a systemic approach—rather than a sector-by-sector sequential approach—is essential. A recent survey conducted in 14 countries found that 71 percent of adults globally consider that climate change is as serious a crisis as COVID-19, with two-thirds supporting government actions to prioritise climate change during the recovery. ii

The United Nations has proposed a framework for the immediate socioeconomic response,iii with which this note is fully consistent and meant to inform and further flesh out both the analysis of the crisis and possible responses.

Finally, the note also highlights the importance of collective action—at the community, country, and global levels. And the response to this crisis is showing how people around the world are responding collectively. The adoption of social distancing behaviour—which in some cases started before formal policies were put in place—could not possibly be fully enforced. It depended on the voluntary cooperation of billions of people. And it was done in response to a shared global risk that brought to the fore as a priority something other than having economies grow more rapidly. If we needed proof of concept that humanity can respond collectively to a shared global challenge, we are now living through it.

Read the full report here or download the attached PDF of the report.

Hamamatsu Voluntary Local Review Report 2019
01 July 2020 - 

Hamamatsu City is a government ordinance designated city, located between Tokyo and Osaka along the Pacific coast, with an area of 1,558km2 and a population of about 800,000. The population of the city is on a downward trend from its peak in 2008. It is projected that the population trend will continue and the aging ratio (27% as of 2018) will increase. One of the features with regard to the population in Hamamatsu is the number of foreign nationals, which accounts for 3% of the total population, 1% higher than the national average.

As a result of the merger of 12 local municipalities in July 2005, Hamamatsu became the second largest municipal area nationwide with diverse natural and social environment that includes urban, rural, mountainous and hilly areas. For this reason, it is referred to as a government ordinance-designated city that is a model of Japan in miniature. With rich forest and fishery resources, the primary industry is thriving in Hamamatsu. In addition, the city is famous for manufacturing and is the location of large corporations that are active on the global stage, such as Suzuki, Yamaha, Kawai, Hamamatsu Photonics, Roland, and FCC. Not only large companies but also small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and venture companies are also active. The higher ratio of primary and secondary industries compared to other government-ordinance designated cities in Japan is one of the characteristics of Hamamatsu.

Challenges

Hamamatsu City faces various challenges including the administrative costs to maintain and upgrade municipal services covering large administrative area, independence of underpopulated areas, administrative services that can meet to socio-economic environment and social needs that changes according to the population decline, low birthrate and progressive aging society, and co-existence with foreign residents. Against the background of the nuclear disaster as a result of the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent deregulation of the electric power industry, Hamamatsu is also facing the need to put measures in place to continue to secure a stable supply of energy and to protect people’s lives and livelihoods against natural disasters (disaster prevention and mitigation).

Localisation and mainstreaming of the SDGs in Hamamatsu City

To tackle with a lot of local challenges, Hamamatsu City is managing city administration in partnership with various local stakeholders and by leveraging municipal budgets and local resources effectively. The Hamamatsu City Comprehensive Plan, the 30-year plan from 2015 is integrated with the principles of the SDGs, and therefore the city is promoting the SDGs implementation through the implementation of the comprehensive plan. The comprehensive plan of the city was drawn up using backcasting techniques. The comprehensive plan includes 12 vision-points for the desirable future of city called the “One Dozen Futures” and sets out comprehensive policies to achieve the vision. In the process of making the comprehensive plan, "the Hamamatsu Future Design Council" composed of experts and citizens having different backgrounds was established to review and discuss the plan. In addition to the discussion at the Council, the city interviewed citizens to hear and reflect more voices from citizens.

Read the full report here or download the attached PDF of the report.

Voluntary Subnational Review: Oaxaca, Mexico
01 July 2020 - This preliminary version of the Voluntary Subnational Review is a first report on the activities that Oaxaca has carried out in relation to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, as well as a space for reflection and self-evaluation that identifies the challenges and lessons learned.

This exercise will be complemented by a methodology that enables the inclusion of citizens, academia, and the productive sector to evaluate the implementation of the 2030 Agenda in the state and municipalities. Additionally, management and performance indicators will have to be built to allow monitoring and faithful monitoring of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and its impact, in order to generate periodic evaluations of the work carried out in the state and municipalities.

Subnational Level

1. As part of the efforts at the subnational level, a diagnosis was made of the situation in Oaxaca to determine the level of linkage between the planning structure and the state priorities with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

  • An analysis of the compatibility of the goals of the 17 SDGs with the objectives set out in the 2016-2022 State Development Plan
  • An exercise to link the 97 indicators of the 2018 budget programs with the 240 indicators of the 2030 Agenda
  • A classification of the 240 indicators of the 2030 Agenda according to the competencies, attributions, and scope of the 32 dependencies that make up the State Public Administration

2. The Legal Group made a proposal to reform the State Planning Law with the modification of 27 of its 121 articles, with the objective that the SDGs are considered in the planning process and that sustainable development is understood in its three dimensions: social, economic, and environmental.

3. The 2016-2022 State Development Plan is the governing document of public policy in Oaxaca. Currently, work is being done to update this plan with a focus on sustainability framed in the 2030 Agenda.

4. In 2018, the 12 sector plans, which establish the priorities, objectives, goals; as well as the current expenditure and investment estimates of each sector for the fulfillment of its objectives, were aligned in its strategic framework to the 2030 Agenda.

5. Three trainings were carried out during 2019 related to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for state public officials, municipal authorities, the staff of the Technical Liaison Modules, and for students of the Economics Department at the Benito Juarez Autonomous University.

Multi-Actor Alliances

1. The methodology for the inclusion of civil society, academia, and the productive sector was set up through which three Working Committees have formed: 1) Social Inclusion, 2) Economic Growth and 3) Environmental Sustainability, considering the three dimensions of sustainable development. These committees are integrated by representatives of state agencies, civil society, academia, and the productive sector. They aim to be a space for public policy innovation.

2. The Government of the State of Oaxaca has a technical cooperation agreement with the GIZ, which has the purpose of contributing to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda at the state and municipal level so that the vision of sustainable development is adopted for the fulfillment of the SDGs.

Municipal Level

1. As part of the technical cooperation with the GIZ, the Municipal Sustainable Development Plans Guide was prepared, which has as its main objective to guide the municipal governments in the preparation of the Municipal Development Plans with a participatory approach and sustainable development.

2. Likewise, in this same cooperation, a pilot sample of 10 municipalities was chosen to work in a coordinated manner with the GIZ and the Technical Work Committee in municipal planning, the prioritization of works, and citizen participation.

3. In order to strengthen the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, 547 Municipal Social Development Councils have been installed, which are spaces for a plural and inclusive participation and dialogue for the implementation of this agenda and are constituted as instances of linkage of the three levels of government, the social, and private sectors.

Read the full report here or download the attached PDF of the report.

UN HABITAT: Enhancing Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) through urban climate action
01 July 2020 - This guide provides practical opportunities for incorporating urban climate action and human settlement issues into the current NDC revision and enhancement process, drawing on existing knowledge and networks. 

01 July 2020 - In the coming months and years, Member States will continue to undertake domestic processes to review, strengthen, and implement their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). Inclusion of urban climate action and sub-national government stakeholders in NDC formulation, priority setting, targets, governance, and implementation has the potential to support government efforts to enhance the ambition and delivery of NDCs. Similarly, the NDCs can inform urban policies and priority setting.

This guide for Enhancing Nationally Determined Contributions through urban climate action provides practical opportunities for incorporating urban climate action and human settlement issues into the current NDC revision and enhancement process, drawing on existing knowledge and networks. 

We hope this guide can support countries to: 

  • Enhance the ambition of their NDCs in the current 2020 and future revision processes, by harnessing the mitigation and adaptation potential of human settlements and urban climate action to deliver a high quality of life while reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and building resilience.
  • Support a more integrated approach to NDC development and implementation across national and local governments.
  • Implement their NDCs by aligning the activities of urban stakeholders behind a common vision for human settlements.
  • Embed their climate objectives into urban decision-making across all sectors of government 
  • Create the enabling frameworks towards the implementation of high-ambition NDCs at the sub-national level and help climate authorities to engage with urban authorities through a common basis of language and understanding.

This UN-Habitat publication was produced in a collaborative effort with a wide variety of expert contributors from; Arup, the Coalition for Urban Transitions, C40, the Environment, Forest & Climate Change Commission of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, the Environmental Protection Agency of Liberia, GIZ, Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy, Global Green Growth Institute, Go Green for Climate,  ICLEI, the NDC Partnership, REN21, UNDP, UNEP, UNFCCC, and the University of Southern Denmark. 

The guide was supported by the Urban-Low Emission Development Strategies (Urban-LEDS) project phase II, funded by the European Commission and implemented by UN-Habitat and ICLEI.

Read the full report here or download the attached PDF of the report.

Sustainable Stimuli II: Designing sustainable post-pandemic recovery programs in developing countries
01 July 2020 - This session, co-hosted by the Asia LEDS Partnership (ALP) and the LEDS Transport Working Group, focuses on the rationales and underlying mechanisms behind the design of sustainable stimulus packages. Panelists will delve into the sustainability potential of government response to the economic fallout of the pandemic.

01 July 2020 - This session, co-hosted by the Asia LEDS Partnership (ALP) and the LEDS Transport Working Group, focuses on the rationales and underlying mechanisms behind the design of sustainable stimulus packages. Panelists will delve into the sustainability potential of government response to the economic fallout of the pandemic.

In this session, we will address a broad range of questions, including:

  • What are the possible mechanisms to make economic stimuli SDG-proof?
  • Based on what rationales and indicators are specific measures (and not others) selected as components of stimulus packages?
  • What is the potential of sustainable public investments in the economic recovery of developing countries?
  • What specific challenges do developing countries face in the transport sector?
  • How can sustainable transport & energy modes and technologies contribute to sustained growth in Asia?
  • Can India’s fiscal stimulus boost investments in sustainable energy & transport?
  • Can the European Green Deal or the German recovery package function as a model for developing countries?

The Speakers:

  • Moderator & Introduction: Alexander Ochs, Chair of the LEDS Energy Working Group & CEO, SD Strategies, Berlin
  • Rajat Kathuria, Director, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, New Delhi
  • Michael Schäfer, Senior Advisor, Agora Energiewende, Berlin
  • Maruxa Cardama, Secretary-General, Partnership on Sustainable Low Carbon Transport (SLOCAT), London
  • Martin Kaspar, Policy Officer Climate Finance, European Commission, Brussels

Event Details:

This series is organized by Berlin think tank SD Strategies for the LEDS Energy Working Group. The session is co-hosted by the Asia LEDS Partnership and the LEDS Transport Working Group.

Download the attached PDF for more information on the event and speaker series.

Voluntary Local Review: The implementation of the UN SDGs in Mannheim 2030
29 June 2020 - The City of Mannheim has developed the “Mannheim 2030” Mission Statement from the 17 UN sustainability goals in a large-scale public participation process. It sets out how we intend to live in Mannheim in 2030 and in doing so live up to our global responsibilities.

29 June 2020 - Since January 2016, the United Nations (UN) 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have served as a blueprint for all nations of the UN to implement sustainable development strategies. To formulate and implement an effective sustainable development strategy in the Rhine-Neckar Metropolitan Region, Mannheim’s municipal government must take a leadership role and be decisive in this capacity. The slogan “Think global, act local” makes sense here as we must be actively responsible in our efficient allocation and use of resources, especially considering the world’s social, economic, and ecological factors are more internationally linked than ever before.

This notion emphasizes the importance of efficient budget planning, coexistence in international and diverse cities, as well as intelligent consumption of food, water, energy, and other goods. Mannheim’s Fair-Trade Town program is an example of the city’s commitment to international relations, as it demonstrates Mannheim’s willingness to engage in fair economic interaction with other international cities and entities. Another key project is “Smart City Mannheim” which focuses on a strategy for modernizing and coordinating a variety of current and future digitalization and clean energy projects. From the medical technology industry to new mobility and industry 4.0, our future and the development of Mannheim are linked by several factors that will shape the city.

The City of Mannheim has developed the “Mannheim 2030” Mission Statement from the 17 UN sustainability goals in a large-scale public participation process. It sets out how we intend to live in Mannheim in 2030 and in doing so live up to our global responsibilities. We will regularly report the progress we have made in this regard to our citizens as well as the United Nations in a Voluntary Local Review (VLR). In this first VLR, we report on how we are achieving the “Mannheim 2030” Mission Statement with a description of the associated indicators and the measures we are already implementing to this end.

Access the full Voluntary Local Review here: https://www.local2030.org/pdf/vlr/mannheim-vlr-2020.pdf

COVID-19 in African Cities: Impacts, Responses and Policies
27 June 2020 - The report proposes several interventions to promptly and effectively address the challenges of COVID-19 pandemic in Africa at the urban level led by national and local governments supported by international and regional development institutions.

27 June 2020 - COVID-19, a global pandemic declared by the World Health Organization (WHO), is crippling the global economy and upending people’s lives thereby threatening sustainable development across all its dimensions. Africa is also facing the dire consequences of the crisis, necessitating timely response, recovery and rebuilding policies and strategies. Globally, urban areas are the epicenters of the epidemic accounting for most of the confirmed COVID-19 cases.

UN-Habitat in collaboration with UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), UN Capital Development Fund (UNCDF), United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLG), African Development Bank (AfDB), and Shelter Afrique have joined hands to produce this new report: COVID-19 in African Cities: Impacts, Responses and Policies.

The report proposes several interventions to promptly and effectively address the challenges of COVID-19 pandemic in Africa at the urban level led by national and local governments supported by international and regional development institutions.

Download the Full Report Here: https://unhabitat.org/covid-19-in-africa-cities-impacts-responses-and-policies

South-South Cooperation Between Cities for Climate Change
26 June 2020 - UNOSSC is organizing a webinar on "South-South Cooperation Between Cities for Climate Change" at 8:30  10:00 am New York Time on June 30. You may register through https://undp.zoom.us/j/95953311012.

26 June 2020 - UNOSSC's South-South and Triangular Cooperation among Maritime-Continental Silk Road Cities for Sustainable Development Project is organizing a webinar on "South-South Cooperation Between Cities for Climate Change" at 8:30  10:00 am New York Time on June 30. 

You may register through https://undp.zoom.us/j/95953311012.

The webinar is an opportunity for scientists and decision-makers to exchange experiences and ideas on: 

  1. How cities from the South are using innovative, collaborative, and evidence-based processes to tackle challenges from climate change;
  2. The role of South-South and triangular cooperation in supporting cities to adapt to climate change in the new reality of life after COVID-19.

It is also part of the global launch of the report  "City-to-City Partnerships and South-South and Triangular Cooperation on Sustainable Urban Development”, developed by UNOSSC in cooperation with the Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI), a long list of co-authors from national and local governments and academia from Latin-America, Africa, and Asia, and also with contributions from UNDP, UN-Habitat, FAO, UNFPA, and UN ESCAP. 

Agenda: 

Opening Remarks (15 min) 

·         Jorge Chediek, UNOSSC Director and Envoy of the Secretary General on South-South Cooperation (Opening Remarks) (5 min)

·         Marcos Regis Da Silva, Executive Director of the Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI) (5 min)

·         Debbie Menezes, Senior Research Advisor, UNOSSC (5 min)

Panel presentations (45 min)

·         Moderator’s welcome by Haroldo Machado-Filho, UNDP Brazil (5min)

·         Jussara Carvalho and Pedro Jacobi, Government of the State of São Paulo, Brazil and University of São Paulo /IAI (8 min)

·         Umamaheswaran Rajasekar, Institute of Urban Affairs, India (8 min)

·         Cristina Huidobro and Michel Carles, Metropolitan Regional Government (GORE) of Santiago, Chile (8 min)

·         Dong Wang and Yuan Zeng, Shenzhen Research Center on Climate Change, Shenzen, China (8 min)

·         Patricia Himschoot and Valeria Massy, City Government of Buenos Aires, Argentina (8 min)

Q&A and discussion (25 min)

Conclusions by Xiaojun Grace Wang, UNOSSC Deputy Director (5min)

For more information, please visit South-South Galaxy and UNOSSC.

For inquiries, please contact Ms. Caihong Wang at caihong.wang@unossc.org.

Suwon Implementation Report on Goal 11
25 June 2020 - Recognizing the importance of the environment, Suwon City has put its priority on people-centered policy for sustainable urban development since 2010 and has been dedicated to establishing urban infrastructure for the safety of citizens.

25 June 2020 - With rapid industrialization and urbanization, the concern over the sustainability of the global environment sparked the international debate on environment and development, and the results of the debate were epitomized by 'Agenda 21' at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. Since then, the UN-led efforts to create a sustainable global environment had resulted in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2001 and led to the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015. As part of the global efforts to achieve SDGs, the United Nations High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) is annually held to check the implementation status of SDGs with a sense of responsibility. The focus of the HLPF 2018, which will be held in July 2018, will be checking the implementation status of “SDG 11.”

SDG 11, which aims to “make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient,” has 7 Targets covering areas of residence, public transportation, urban planning, cultural heritage, resilience, environment and waste management and public space and three Sub-targets working as the fundamental tools for the implementation: linking urban, peri-urban and rural areas; integrated policy; and government capacity. The tasks of SDG 11 are in line with the tasks that the Network of Local Governments (NLG) have pursued the recognition that the success of sustainable development is up to cities and their local governments.

SDG 11, as a key agenda for the world's sustainable development, has been discussed at various conferences like the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (HABITAT) and by many organizations including ICLEI-Local Government for Sustainability. Especially, the "New Urban Agenda (NUA)", which was adopted at HABITAT III held in Quito in 2016, well epitomizes the essence of the agenda. The close partnership between diverse stakeholders and their participation would be the key to achieving SDGs. Especially, the cooperation between the United Nations, member states, local governments and other stakeholders would be of the utmost importance.

Recognizing the importance of the environment, Suwon City has put its priority on people-centered policy for sustainable urban development since 2010 and has been dedicated to establishing urban infrastructure for the safety of citizens. The city enacted the Ordinance for Sustainable Development and launched the Suwon Council for Sustainable Development, an organization with a private-public governance structure, and adopted its own 10 Sustainable Development Goals through a privatepublic partnership, which is localized and optimized version of UN SDGs. In addition, the Suwon Research Institute (SRI) was established as a think-tank to study the specific tasks and strategies of Suwon for the implementation of Sustainable Development Goals while the newly established Suwon Sustainable City Foundation is mandated with implementing the tasks and projects related to urban sustainability. With the hosing of ICLEI Korea Office in Suwon in 2012, Suwon is also taking the leadership on urban sustainability in South Korea by making efforts to spread the international community’s efforts and experiences on achieving sustainable development.

Suwon City and the Suwon Research Institute, in cooperation with various entities and organizations, examined the tasks and implementation status of the 7 targets of SDG 11, in line with the HLPF to be held in July 2018. This paper is Suwon Implementation Report on Goal 11 and has been prepared after through the participation of various entities and organization in Suwon making it more special and differentiated from those reported solely developed by the single institute or local government.

READ THE FULL REPORT HERE: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/20531Suwon_Implementation_Report_on_Goal_11_for_HLPF_2018_Final.pdf