City2City
How to use fog to give water to Lima’s defenders of nature
Few megacities were settled in a desert. Lima is one of them. Unlike the rest of Peru, here water is a naturally scarce resource that depends on glaciers that climate change has already melted by 51% in this country, according to the National Water Authority. Without rain, but with a lot of fog, in this South American capital the communities that defend the hills have found in this thick mist an alternative to water scarcity that could mark a before and after in Peru’s commitment to the climate fight.

How to use fog to give water to Lima’s defenders of nature

Defenders of the fog oases, the last green belt in Peru’s capital, have organized to use fog as a solution to water shortages and the climate crisis

Originally published by UNDP Peru on 28 October 2020

By Sally Jabiel

“Here in the fog oases there is no water, but they are very humid and there is a lot of fog. Our pilot project turns fog into water”, explains Noé Neira, president of the Lomas Paraíso Association, which protects this unique and seasonal ecosystem that only emerges in winter when the arid hills of Lima turn green. “Before the fog catchers, each of the neighbors gathered a bucket of water and went up on Sundays to water the plants,” he says.

According to the Coastal Fog Oases Map in Lima, between 2005 and 2017 450.73 out of 19 435.81 hectares of this fragile ecosystem have been lost to land invasion and trafficking. And, despite the neighboring communities trying to reforest them, they lack sufficient water. “We only have water from two o’clock to six in the afternoon. That forces us to store it in drums and tanks and expose our health,” says Ana María Sotomayor, a neighbor and defender of the Lomas de Primavera.

In effect, around 700,000 people from the capital’s poorest districts — many surrounded by fog oases — do not have access to a water service network, according to the National Superintendency of Sanitation Services (SUNASS).

Being the third most vulnerable country to the climate crisis, on top of the continued loss of glaciers, puts water availability at risk, especially in the capital where access to water is already quite unequal. “The concentration of our economic activity and our population in the arid strip of the territory make water management extremely important to address in the country’s adaptation agenda,” says Gabriel Quijandría, Minister of Environment of that country. Hence, the staunch governmental response to this climate emergency through its Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC, for its acronym in English) where water is one of the priorities for adaptation to climate change.

For more than 20 months, a joint effort by multiple sectors and actors of the Peruvian government developed a roadmap to implement these NDCs and, through this, fulfill the country’s commitment to the Paris Agreement to adapt to climate impacts. Based on a participatory process with multiple actors and government sectors, the United Nations Development Programme’s NDC Support Program — financed by Spain, Germany and the European Union — helped to generate the NDC water roadmap. The result is a total of 30 measures framed in three uses of water: population, agricultural and energy; as well as in the multisectoral management of this resource.

From planning to action

“Water plays an important role. If we lose the fog oases, then we would also lose the condensation of the mist and we would be at the mercy of the consequences of climate change”, warns Ascensio Vásquez, president of the Lomas de Primavera Ecological Association.

This climate planning and its results have laid the foundations for pilots like the one that is being developed from the communities that protect the fog oases. With the support of the NDC Support Program and the “Conservation, management and rehabilitation of the fragile fog oases ecosystems” initiative, also known EBA Lomas, to demonstrate the approach of the roadmap of water.

El trabajo de Ascencio Vásquez al proteger las lomas en Lima ha sido homenajeado por el Congreso de la República que lo reconoce como defensor ambiental.

“We have installed a fog catcher in the upper part 800 meters up high in the fog oases,” says Vásquez. “From there the networks come and the water reaches the reservoirs that are in the upper part and then we go down until we reach the plants that we have planted in the greenhouses.” With the right conditions, each fog catcher can capture up to 60 liters of water per day per square meter. This liquid, only suitable for agricultural use, is distributed drop by drop, in an automated irrigation system, to the greenhouses filled with tara trees (Caesalpinia spinosa), a native species used for medicinal purposes since pre-Incan times, that has practically disappeared from the fog oases.

According to estimates by EbA Lomas, these nurseries have the capacity to produce 10,000 tara trees in five months.

This production, in addition to serving to reforest the hills, can be sold and used to promote ecotourism for the benefit of these communities that protect this green belt that borders the capital. This integrates the fog oases into the climate change adaptation strategy, and as minister Quijandría puts it, “incorporates urban planning and creates opportunities to generate wellbeing and income for the local population”.

Right to the fog

Although 13,500 hectares of the fog oases are already protected as a Regional Conservation Area by the Municipality of Lima, the success of pilots like this one also lies in the empowerment of the communities and their inclusion in decision-making to conserve this ecosystem. “They already know that they cannot touch the fog oases today, it is forbidden and they cannot invade that part. I feel a bit liberated by that,” says Sotomayor, who for defending these spaces, along with Vásquez, has received death threats from land trafficker mafias.

Therefore, in addition to empowering these environmental defenders, this pilot project is working with local governments where the hills are to better understand the value of these areas for the availability of water, lining their priorities with the NDCs. Likewise, a climate monitoring station is being implemented to alert authorities of illegal activities in the territory that could put the fog oases and, therefore, the availability of water at risk.

To be able to face these risks, the pilot project works alongside district municipalities where the fog oases are located to increase conscience about the importance of protecting these ecosystems. Complemented by a climate monitoring station which is being implemented to alert authorities of illegal activities in the territory that could put the fog oases and, therefore, the availability of water at risk. This station is being linked with the climate monitoring station developed by EbA Lomas, the only one of its kind that predicts episodes of high fog.

“Fog catchers are very economical instruments, because they avoid the use of drinking water for irrigation and also make it easy to obtain water from the peaks and store it,” explains Neira. This is why the pilot is seeing how feasible it is to create rights to exploit the use of mist, placing special emphasis on the fact that it would be rights over an area and not a catchment point. This analysis has been shared with the National Water Authority, which will evaluate considering modifications to its administrative process to include rules for the use of mist water.

The water of the future

Bringing water to almost nine million inhabitants is the challenge of Lima, a constantly growing capital that is among the 20 cities with the highest risk of water stress in the world. As climate change gets more severe, experiences like this one open new opportunities for adaptation, facing a scenario where half the population could be left without water.

This experience undertaken by the communities of the fog oases — which themselves do not have regular drinking water — is an example of how the solutions to the climate crisis and other development challenges lie in nature.

“Water is life. If there is no water, there is no humanity, there are no plants, there is nothing. It would be a desert,” says Neira. More than just a community-based approach, this solution is aligned with the Nationally Determined Contributions, and if it continues to be beneficial it could be replicated in other arid and vulnerable areas, thus being part of the country’s climate struggle for a future where nature is at the center of our decisions.

Retrieved from https://pnudperu.medium.com/how-to-use-fog-to-give-water-to-limas-defenders-of-nature-98d013f11779

Parallel Session on UNDP's Study: "Greening of the Philippines’ Recovery and Resilience Strategies"

Parallel Session on UNDP's Study: "Greening of the Philippines’ Recovery and Resilience Strategies"

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), with support from the

Government of the United Kingdom, and in collaboration with Global Factor and ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability, has undertaken a study on green recovery in the Philippines. The study aims to take advantage of the opportunity to redesign the development trajectory of the country after the COVID-19 pandemic towards a greener and more sustainable one.  

This virtual session will be held on 10 November 2022, 10:30 AM – 12:00 NN (Philippines time), via Zoom to discuss the key results and highlights of the study and how the national government, local governments, and private sector can lead the way in reframing and rewriting the Philippines’ development trajectory towards a greener one. 

Specifically, the parallel session aims to: 

  • Present the highlights of the report’s comparison of the Philippines taking a business-as-usual approach versus green recovery simulations;  
  • Present green recovery entry points and recommendations for the country’s agriculture, construction, manufacturing, and transport sectors;  
  • Present selected LGUs’ initiatives aligned with green recovery and key takeaways from these efforts;  
  • Gather perspectives of technical and policy experts and representatives from national agencies; local government units, private sector, non-government organizations, academia, and other stakeholders on green recovery efforts and its adoption in the country.

Interested attendees may register via this link: https://bit.ly/greenrecoveryPHAttached, for your reference, is the session's indicative agenda.  

Should you have questions and clarifications, please contact ICLEI SEAS Communications Officer Mr. Chris Noel Hidalgo at chris.hidalgo@iclei.org or via the mobile number (+63) 961-919-6055. 

Cover Photo of Manila, Philippines from Unsplash: https://unsplash.com/photos/vL2h7xYiIlk

From Risk to Resilience: Building a Local Climate of Success

This Making Cities Resilient 2030 (MCR2030) webinar series profiles local governments that are seizing the moment to move from climate risk to climate resilience. As this ‘window of opportunity’ narrows, these municipalities are demonstrating that climate action is an investment and not a cost.

The first webinar brings together two local governments – Wroclaw, in Poland, and Kampala, in Uganda – who will outline their own climate resilience ambitions and actions and share practical policy recommendations for other municipalities to scale up their risk reduction efforts.

From Risk to Resilience: Building a Local Climate of Success

by United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR)

This Making Cities Resilient 2030 (MCR2030) webinar series profiles local governments that are seizing the moment to move from climate risk to climate resilience. As this ‘window of opportunity’ narrows, these municipalities are demonstrating that climate action is an investment and not a cost.

The first webinar brings together two local governments – Wroclaw, in Poland, and Kampala, in Uganda – who will outline their own climate resilience ambitions and actions and share practical policy recommendations for other municipalities to scale up their risk reduction efforts.

Register Here 

COP27: A chance to act - we can still make a difference

We know what we need to do, and how to make our planet clean, sustainable, and equitable. We have the technology and the evidence to act. What we need more than anything is political will and investment. COP27, taking place in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, is an opportunity to stop talking and start acting. Change is happening around us, and the Paris Agreement points the way.

COP27: A chance to act - We can still make a difference

Published by UNDP on 2 November 2022

The 27th United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP27, comes at the tail end of a record-smashing summer for the northern hemisphere.

Punishing early spring heatwaves in South Asia killed hundreds. Many countries recorded the highest temperatures since records began, more than 120 years ago. Europeans experienced their hottest summer in 500 years, accompanied by wildfires, droughts and death. Major rivers reached record low levels. In August a third of Pakistan flooded, with devastating consequences for its people and economy. China experienced its hottest temperature ever, and several cities in Iraq became the hottest places on earth, with temperatures of more than 50C/122F. Hurricane Ian, which slammed the Caribbean and the United States, offered further proof that no country is immune from the effects of climate change.

These events are not an aberration. The last seven years have been the hottest ever recorded. And they’re just a taste of what to expect if we continue to fail to act on global heating.

There is no time to lose. We are rapidly approaching dangerous tipping points for every aspect of human life, from our health and safety, our natural environment, our economies, to our property and infrastructure.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres has said climate action must be our “top global priority”.

Change is possible, hope is imperative

And yet the future is not written. The climate and nature crises are not inevitable. We can still make a difference.

We know what we need to do, and how to make our planet clean, sustainable, and equitable. We have the technology and the evidence to act. What we need more than anything is political will and investment.

COP27, taking place in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, is an opportunity to stop talking and start acting.

Change is happening around us, and the Paris Agreement points the way. 

A photo in this story

A photo in this story

COP27 will be about “planning for implementation” for all the promises and pledges around net-zero commitments, the protection of forests and climate finance made last year during COP26 in Glasgow. Photos: Shutterstock

Last year, COP26 laid the groundwork for further, and more ambitious action. The Glasgow Climate Pact aimed to turn the 2020s into a decade of committed climate action—ramping up efforts to ensure that we are resilient in the face of climate change, while at the same time curbing greenhouse gas emissions. For the first time, nations were called on to phase out coal power and inefficient—and inequitable—fossil fuel subsidies.

Each country’s national pledge – their nationally determined contributions (NDCs) – offers a unique blueprint for immediate climate action. NDCs are politically- backed tools for defining and advancing sustainable development pathways.

In country after country, UNDP has witnessed, alongside our key partners, the transformation that takes place when leadership, political will and investment come together.

UNDP has been supporting governments and citizens on the frontlines of climate action and has seen firsthand the benefits and opportunities of investing in NDCs. UNDP’s Climate Promise supports 84 percent of all developing country NDC submissions.

Our Global Policy Network has a vast portfolio of multilateral, bilateral, and vertical funds. The Nature, Climate and Energy portfolio spans 137 countries and 802 projects, including the UN’s largest portfolio on climate.

UNDP’s Sustainable Energy Hub is helping deliver on these targets while simultaneously accelerating progress towards other SDGs. The Sustainable Finance Hub is supporting governments, the private sector and international financial institutions to ramp up financing for the SDGs.

Country targets

To pay for urgent climate action, UNDP is working with the Indonesian government as it becomes a world leader in “green sukuks”—Islamic bonds which have raised more than US$2.75 billion.

Lebanon has focused on integrating the economic and societal benefits of climate action by aligning its NDCs with national development plans. A Lebanon Green Investment Facility will support projects and financial instruments for the private sector. UNDP is supporting these efforts alongside the World Bank and the Islamic Development Bank.

Peru has estimated that around 40 percent of the US$91 billion funding gap needed to implement its NDC priorities between now and 2030 is best suited for private sector investments. Plans for green finance and for private and finance sector engagement have been prepared, along with a permanent consultative group that includes 20 of the country’s largest business groups. Preparations for green bonds and carbon bonds are well underway.

As Serbia begins the move away from coal as the dominant energy source it’s also ensuring that the transition is equitable. With support from UNDP, the government of Japan and the EU, the government is defining a strategy to ensure that all those dependent on the intensive use of fossil fuels will not be left behind. Business models and green technology investments that help to de-carbonize the economy and industry will be advanced.

UNDP and ILO worked with Zimbabwe on a green jobs assessment. It found climate policies present a huge potential for job creation, especially for women and young people. In conservation agriculture alone, up to 30,000 jobs could be created for every $1million invested.

The right side of history

The decisions we make today will affect not only the almost 8 billion people who live on our planet, but every person in every generation to come.

We do not need to choose between solving the energy crisis, the food security crisis, the biodiversity crisis and the climate crisis.

Every dollar invested in renewable energy creates three times more jobs than in the fossil fuel industry, while energy efficiency investments can create five times as many.

Early adaptation investments offer a 1:3 rate of return over the next decade, and a $1.8 trillion investment in adaptation measures would save $7.1 trillion in avoided costs.

Sustainably managed forests could create $230 billion in business opportunities and 16 million jobs by 2030.

UNDP calls on all governments, private sector, civil society and communities to champion and invest in responding to this global emergency.

We need political will, technical and financial support to drive the much-needed transformation toward net zero and climate resilience. The world has made promises through NDCs – now we must fulfill them.

For the original article and additional visuals, visit https://stories.undp.org/cop27-a-chance-to-act?utm_source=social&utm_medium=undp&utm_campaign=cop27

COP27’s Success Hinges on Loss and Damage Finance Discussions

For decades, vulnerable nations have called for financial support from rich countries to help them cope with increasingly alarming and damaging climate impacts that they hold little responsibility for causing. Yet many developed countries, including the U.S. and E.U., have long resisted their requests. The upcoming U.N. climate summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt (COP27) offers an opportunity to break the stalemate on this critical issue and start taking action. Here’s how:

COP27’s Success Hinges on Loss and Damage Finance Discussions

Authors: Ani Dasgupta and Preety Bhandari | Published by World Resources Institute (WRI) on 28 October 2022

Cover Image by: Abdul Majeed/EU Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid

Since the monsoon season started in June, the worst floods in Pakistan’s history have killed 1,700 people and left more than 33 million homeless. One-third of the entire country was under water at one point, decimating its crops, destroying clean water sources and infrastructure, and causing $40 billion in damages. The destruction is projected to lower Pakistan’s GDP growth from 5% in FY2022 to 2% in FY2023.

This is not just an extreme weather event — it's an economic disaster. And while these numbers lay out the costs and scale of devastation, they fail to factor in the full impact — from the emotional and physical toll on affected families, to the effort and courage needed to rebuild.

Pakistan is far from the only country to experience climate-fueled disasters this year. Droughts in Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia have killed millions of livestock and destroyed crops. Spiking temperatures in the Sahel — a region spanning 10 countries and home to 135 million people — are drying up water supplies and threatening to trigger a major food and migration crisis.

These are the devastating impacts communities around the world are living with under just 1.1 degrees C (2 degrees F) of global temperature rise — and the world is on track to warm far more than that. As Pakistan’s recent flooding illustrates, much of the destruction already goes beyond the limits of many families’ and communities’ ability to adapt. These “losses and damages” occur when climate impacts cannot be avoided, either due to reaching the climate tipping point of irreversible impacts or due to lack of resources to adapt.

Loss and damage disproportionally affects vulnerable populations — people on the front lines of the crisis with the least resources. Almost always, these are also the people who have contributed the least to the problem. Each dollar of damage has a more severe impact in a poor, vulnerable community than in a wealthier one. Climate impacts are happening across the world, but it is only the rich countries that have the resources to weather them. For example, the recent devastation of Hurricane Ian in the U.S. may have caused $67 billion in damages, but thanks to insurance coverage, property owners will be able to recover more easily. While cutting greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to climate impacts is crucial, it is clear that these measures are not enough to avoid significant losses and damages in many vulnerable countries.

1) Make loss and damage finance a standing agenda item in formal negotiations.

On day one of the COP27 summit, developed nations must answer the call of the G77 — a bloc of 134 developing countries currently chaired by Pakistan — and shift from “listening mode” into action mode.

While developed nations have agreed through the U.N.’s Santiago Network to provide technical support to developing countries for addressing loss and damage, last year at COP26, wealthy nations rejected the proposal for a loss and damage finance mechanism. Instead, they agreed to a two-year dialogue ending in 2024 to discuss possible funding arrangements. These are informal sessions with no decision-making authority. Adopting loss and damage finance arrangements as a formal agenda item at COP27 in Egypt can help reach consensus on solutions.

Encouragingly Frans Timmerman, the EU’s leading climate negotiator, has already signaled support for a “formal space on the agenda to discuss this challenge.” Similarly, U.S. Special Climate Envoy John Kerry has indicated that the U.S. is determined to make progress. It remains to be seen what the agreed formulation of this agenda item will be, and those details will matter. One thing is certain: If funding on loss and damage doesn’t get on the formal agenda, the climate summit could be derailed right from the start.

2) Developed nations must move on from the old narrative of liability and compensation and step up finance in solidarity with vulnerable nations.

Wealthy nations have long pushed back on the notion of providing finance for loss and damage, arguing that it may be construed as an obligation for liability and compensation. However, at the U.N. climate summit in Paris in 2015, countries agreed through the Paris Agreement decision that loss and damage does not involve liability and compensation. Progress on finance for loss and damage should not be held back at COP27 by an already-settled debate.

Developed countries should provide funds for addressing losses and damages not because of legal liability, but because supporting vulnerable countries is the right thing to do — not only for the people facing existential threats from climate change, but for the stability and security of the entire global community. In a recent interview, Dr. Saleemul Huq from the International Centre for Climate Change and Development and an ACT2025 partner said that what developing countries are asking for is “finance for loss and damage in the spirit of solidarity.”

Even if vulnerable nations all went zero-emissions tomorrow, past emissions from the G20 have locked in a high climate impacts scenario that disproportionately affects poorer nations. G20 countries represent about 10% of all countries but emit 75% of the world's greenhouse gases. In comparison, sub-Saharan Africa represents 25.5% of all countries, but only contributes 4.7% of emissions.

Furthermore, countries have vastly different capacities for mitigation and mobilizing finance, and global finances are incredibly skewed toward the richer, more powerful nations. When coupled with the existing debt crises in many vulnerable countries, large sums of losses and damages will likely push them into a severe financial crunch. We need solidarity to help address this critical challenge.

3) Countries must launch a process at COP27 to identify and establish funding arrangements at COP28 in 2023.

The most pressing steps for negotiators involve identifying where and for what financing is most needed, and how to quickly mobilize the necessary funds. Negotiators will need to examine whether existing finance channels such as the Green Climate Fund and Global Environment Facility can help, assess how a new dedicated financing mechanism could complement them, and explore new and innovative pathways for financing. One idea: U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres called on developed countries to tax the windfall profits of oil and gas companies and redirect some of those revenues to recovery efforts in nations affected by climate disasters.

Countries should apply lessons learned from funds and institutions established under the UNFCCC, including the Green Climate Fund and the Adaptation Fund.

Outside of the UNFCCC process, the past year has seen several promising new initiatives — including Denmark’s loss and damage finance pledge, the V20’s new funding program under its multi-donor trust fund, Germany’s G7 proposal on the Global Shield against Climate Risks, and Scotland’s continued push for loss and damage finance (on the heels of its own $2.2-million commitment). These efforts are welcomed and inspiring, but they should not detract from the need for a broader multilateral funding approach that prioritizes public sources of funding for addressing loss and damage.

COP27 should kickstart a timebound decision-making process for formalizing funding arrangements for responding to loss and damage under the UNFCCC, while ensuring coherence with the larger landscape of financing outside the UNFCCC.

No More Delay in Financing Loss and Damage

The number one litmus test for the success of COP27 negotiations is progress on mobilizing finance for addressing loss and damage. Further delay is indefensible — not only would it be a major loss for COP27, but the fallout would be felt in vulnerable nations and communities for years to come.

It’s time to stop avoiding the realities of the current global climate crisis. Loss and damage is the third pillar to addressing climate change, alongside curbing emissions and adapting to impacts. COP27 is an opportunity for all countries to act on that reality.

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/insights/cop27-loss-damage-finance?utm_campaign=wridigest&utm_source=wridigest-2022-11-02&utm_medium=email

UNEP Adaptation Gap Report 2022

Climate change is landing blow after blow upon humanity and the planet, an onslaught that will only intensify in the coming years even if the world begins to bring down greenhouse gas emissions. UNEP’s Adaptation Gap Report 2022: Too Little, Too Slow – Climate adaptation failure puts world at risk finds that the world must urgently increase efforts to adapt to these impacts of climate change. 

Adaptation Gap Report 2022

Published by United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on 3 November 2022

Climate change is landing blow after blow upon humanity and the planet, an onslaught that will only intensify in the coming years even if the world begins to bring down greenhouse gas emissions. UNEP’s Adaptation Gap Report 2022: Too Little, Too Slow – Climate adaptation failure puts world at risk finds that the world must urgently increase efforts to adapt to these impacts of climate change. 

What’s new in this year’s report? 

The report looks at progress in planning, financing and implementing adaptation actions. At least 84 per cent of Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) have established adaptation plans, strategies, laws and policies – up 5 per cent from the previous year. The instruments are getting better at prioritizing disadvantaged groups, such as Indigenous peoples. 

However, financing to turn these plans and strategies into action isn’t following. International adaptation finance flows to developing countries are 5-10 times below estimated needs and the gap is widening. Estimated annual adaptation needs are USD 160-340 billion by 2030 and USD 315-565 billion by 2050.

Implementation of adaptation actions – concentrated in agriculture, water, ecosystems and cross-cutting sectors – is increasing. However, without a step change in support, adaptation actions could be outstripped by accelerating climate risks, which would further widen the adaptation implementation gap.

The report looks at the benefits of prioritizing actions that both reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help communities adapt, such as nature-based solutions, and calls for countries to step up funding and implementation of adaptation actions. Additionally, the report discusses adaptation effectiveness and looks at adaptation-mitigation linkages and co-benefits. 

Access the full report here: https://www.unep.org/resources/adaptation-gap-report-2022

or download the attached PDF of the report.

UNEP Publication launch: Adaptation Gap Report 2022
The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) will launch the 2022 edition of the Adaptation Gap Report in a virtual press conference in the lead up to the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27).

The report provides an update on the global status and progress of the adaptation process across three elements: planning, financing, and implementation. This edition also focuses on the effectiveness of adaptation and considers adaptation-mitigation co-benefits.

When: Thursday, 3 November 2022; 6:00 am EDT/1:00 pm EAT/11:00 am CET

Where: UNEP YouTube Live | UN WebTV

Duration: 45 minutes

Panelists:

  • Inger Andersen, Executive Director, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
  • Mami Mizutori, Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction and Head of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDDR)
  • Ovais Sarmad, Deputy Executive Secretary, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
  • Henry Neufeldt, Chief Scientific Editor of the UNEP Adaptation Gap Report 2022 (UNEP-CCC)

Retrieved from https://www.unep.org/events/publication-launch/adaptation-gap-report-2022

Financing Low Carbon, Resilient and Inclusive Cities Through Multi-Level Governance
This event will bring together experts and practitioners to discuss and share examples of how to effectively finance low carbon, resilient and inclusive cities through multi-level action.

Financing Low Carbon, Resilient and Inclusive Cities Through Multi-Level Governance

by World Resources Institute (WRI) |  -  | Multi-level Action Pavilion, Blue Zone at COP27

Join via Zoom (passcode: 7664)

Description

Cities already account for 70% of global CO2 emissions from energy use; left unaddressed, emissions will continue to rise as urbanization accelerates, especially in developing countries. Cities are also at the forefront of climate change vulnerability: 70% of cities are already experiencing harmful impacts to their citizens and infrastructure as a result of climate change.

Cities are not only critical to delivering a green and just transition while limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees, they also offer an enormous economic opportunity. Research has shown that a bundle of technically feasible low-carbon measures could cut emissions from buildings, transport, materials use and waste in cities by almost 90% by 2050; support 45 million jobs in 2050, and generate energy and material savings worth US$23.9 trillion by 2050. Raising the investment required to seize this opportunity however requires collaboration. Cities, regions, national governments and investors must work together to not only increase access to finance but also target it innovatively and strategically.

Speakers

  • Ani Dasgupta, President & CEO, WRI
  • Governor Samuel Garcia, Nuevo León, Mexico
  • Lord Mayor Lowe of Banjul, the Gambia, Vice Chair of the Global Parliament of Mayors
  • Dr. Barbara Buchner, Global Managing Director, Climate Policy Initiative
  • Sheela Patel, Founder and Director, Society for the Promotion of Area Resource Centres (SPARC) India
  • Joseph Muturi, Chair of the Board, Slum Dwellers International
  • Graham Watkins, Chief of the Climate Change and Sustainability Division, Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

Cover image by: Shutterstock/HandmadePictures

Primary Contact: Pandora Batra, Strategic Engagement Manager, Climate Program / WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/events/2022/11/financing-low-carbon-resilient-and-inclusive-cities-through-multi-level-governance

Clean Air Catalyst: A Multi-Level Approach to Accelerating Clean Air and Climate Action

This session highlights the importance of integrated objectives and collaboration in the Clean Air Catalyst, a global partnership launched by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) in 2020, led by World Resources Institute and Environmental Defense Fund. Representatives from the partnership and three pilot cities will share their approach to scaling up a multi-city program to accelerate locally tailored solutions to air pollution that also tackle climate change, improve human health and address gender and income inequality.

Clean Air Catalyst: A Multi-Level Approach to Accelerating Clean Air and Climate Action

 -  | Multi-level Action Pavilion, Blue Zone at COP27 | Livestream available

Link to Zoom session (passcode: 454971)

Speakers

  • Genevieve Maricle, Senior Advisor, Climate and Environment, USAID 
  • Pratibha Pal, Indore Municipal Commissioner (virtual)
  • H.E Sakaja Arthur Johnson, Governor of Nairobi City County (TBC)
  • John Kioli, Chairman Kenya Climate Change Working Group and Executive Director Green Africa Foundation
  • Sarah Vogel, Senior VP of Health, Environmental Defense Fund (virtual)
  • Koni Samadhi, WRI Indonesia Country Director
  • Michael Doust, World Resources Institute 

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/events/2022/11/clean-air-catalyst-multi-level-approach-accelerating-clean-air-and-climate-action

Equity and Climate Solutions in Cities: Accelerating Actions by Key Actors

This event, in partnership with Slum Dwellers International and Mahila Housing Trust, will demonstrate how national, state, city/metropolitan governments, civil society and the private sector can collaborate to make cities around the world more equitable and sustainable. It will highlight strategies to tackle inequities and climate jointly in cities by focusing on urban infrastructure and service delivery in the areas of land and housing, water, sanitation, transportation, and energy.

Equity and Climate Solutions in Cities: Accelerating Actions by Key Actors

by World Resources Institute (WRI)

 -  | Multi-level Action Pavilion, Blue Zone, Livestream available

Livestream link (passcode: 488635)

WRI will launch a handy guidance document on how these key actors can center equity in climate mitigation and adaptation actions involving these key urban services that affect people's lives. The guidance is based on WRI's flagship report, Seven Transformations for More Equitable and Sustainable Cities, launched just before COP26.

Speakers:

  • Ani Dasgupta, President & CEO, World Resources Institute
  • Luis Donaldo Colosio, Mayor of Monterrey, Mexico
  • Frannie Léautier, CEO of Southbridge Investments
  • Joseph Muturi, Chair of Slum Dwellers International
  • Bijal Brahmbhatt, Director, Mahila Housing SEWA Trust
  • Carlos Lopes, Professor, Mandela School of Public Governance, University of Cape Town

Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/events/2022/11/equity-and-climate-solutions-cities-accelerating-actions-key-actors

Primary Contact: Anjali Mahenda, Director of Global Research, WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities