City2City
Launch of six Voluntary Local Reviews in Costa Rica as a tool for SDG acceleration
On the 6th of December, the UNDA-14 Project lead by UN-Habitat with UNECE, UNDESA and UCLG will be launched with an online workshop gathering pilot cities and implementing partners. The project aims to advance socio-economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic and SDG localization in Eastern European and Central Asian countries in transition: Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Georgia and Serbia by harnessing the potential of VLRs.

Launch of six VLRs in Costa Rica

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On the 30th of November, six municipalities in Costa Rica will present the first VLRs of the country: Atenas, Belén, Escazú, Goicoechea, Puriscal and Sarchí. This pioneering activity is part of the initiative “Cantones ProODS” that provides support to the Municipalities to localize the SDGs, this is led by Mideplan, IFAM and UN Costa Rica. UN-Habitat has supported the development of the VLRs.

The session is organized by IFAM, Mideplan, UN Costa Rica and UN-Habitat and will be developed in Spanish.

The event will be broadcasted through Facebook and YouTube following these links:

What did COP27 accomplish and what actions can we expect as a result?
  • Held in Egypt, COP27 was dubbed the Africa COP, providing an important opportunity to table issues critical to the continent; and the COP of implementation, where pledges would be translated into action on the ground.

  • The most talked about achievement of COP27 was that an agreement was finally reached to establish and operationalise a new loss and damage fund. Beyond this, progress was underwhelming, but while there were disappointments, there were significant gains, too.

  • Antonia Gawel, Head of Climate Change, and Nathan Cooper, Lead Partnerships & Engagement Strategy at the World Economic Forum, look back at the highlights of COP27 and show which wheels it has put in motion.

What did COP27 accomplish and what actions can we expect as a result?

Published by World Economic Forum on 23 November 2022

Authors:

  • Antonia Gawel, Head, Climate; Deputy Head, Centre for Nature & Climate Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
  • Nathan Cooper, Lead, Partnerships and Engagement Strategy, Climate Action Platform, World Economic Forum

Unpicking the key learnings from COP27

COP27 was dubbed the Africa COP and the implementation COP. It provided an opportunity to table issues critical to the continent and a chance to turn the words, drawn up at COP26, into action. Confronted with a global food and energy crisis, increasing extreme weather events and record greenhouse gas concentrations, COP27 was a key milestone to instill renewed solidarity between countries and deliver on the landmark Paris Agreement.

The World Economic Forum hosted over 50 interactive sessions, bringing together over 800 leaders spanning sectors, generations and countries. These sessions drove multistakeholder action across areas as broad as raising climate ambition, financing the Net-Zero transition, accelerating industry decarbonisationwater securityadaptation financeocean innovation and more.

Was COP27 a success?

COP27 did not progress commitments or show evidence of significant action by countries to further draw down global emissions. Every year and every COP is critical to progress this key objective – without it, the world will not limit the global temperature rise to below 1.5 degrees Celsius. By this measure, COP27 was a missed opportunity and potentially a step back.

On the other hand, as the ‘Africa COP,’ the issues of critical importance to developing economies, including climate adaptation and loss and damage were brought to the fore, rebalancing the negotiations and reinstating trust between parties. A breakthrough agreement to provide loss and damage funding for vulnerable countries hit hard by climate disasters was seen as a success, although details of the fund still need to be fleshed out.

What did COP27 achieve?

When you work on climate day in and day out, you come away from every conference feeling that more could have been achieved. While we didn’t leave COP27 as hopeful as we would have liked, there were many positives leaving us optimistic for the future.

Alongside the agreement reached on loss and damage, it was also encouraging to witness China and the US reopen their conversation on tackling climate change, and to see adaptation dialogues begin on enhancing resilience for 4 billion people living in the most climate-vulnerable communities by 2030.

The largely untapped innovative finance model (enabled by COP negotiations, that monetises avoided or reduced emissions through carbon markets) was tapped into by African nations, who announced a carbon market partnership. Under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement, countries can work together to raise money for much-needed decarbonisation and adaptation projects, through trading carbon credits on regional or international markets.

Then, at the G20, which ran alongside COP27, the Indonesia Just Energy Transition Partnership was launched to help finance the energy transition. This is important because coal contributes to three-quarters of the power sector’s CO2 emissions and coal needs to be phased out almost six times faster than it has been over the past five years to align the power sector with well below a 1.5 degrees Celsius global average temperature rise.

The private sector stepped up

We also saw the private sector take a major role at COP27, particularly across the areas of climate ambition, low-carbon technology and climate adaptation. It was recognised that the adaptation market could be worth $2 trillion per year by 2026, with the developing world standing to benefit from much of this. Thousands of leaders at COP27 also committed to working towards 1.5 degrees Celsius.

We were also proud to announce the First Movers Coalition's expansion, from 25 members when it was launched at COP26 to 65 members, which includes companies and governments. Those First Movers sent a $12 billion market signal to pull forward critical, low-carbon technologies of the future to decarbonise the cement and concrete industry.

More than 100 CEOs and senior executives of large multinational corporations, all members of the Alliance of CEO Climate Leaders, signed an open letter to leaders at COP27 committing to work side-by-side with governments to deliver bold climate action and encourage all businesses to accelerate the Net Zero transition by setting science-based targets, disclosing emissions and catalysing decarbonisation and partnerships across global value chains.

Additionally, major agricultural trading and processing companies launched the Agriculture Sector Roadmap, which moves the industry towards science-based, transparent and traceable actions to avert and reverse deforestation. And, 26 countries signed a global MOU that 100% of new truck and bus sales will be zero emissions by 2040.

Beyond COP27 Leaders On The Road Ahead

We also heard some largely uplifting thoughts at one of the COP27 closing panels Beyond COP27 Leaders On The Road Ahead. From a national perspective, James Mnyupe, Presidential Economic Advisor to the Office of the President of Namibia, said he was pleased to have “mobilised about $63 million in grant funding to get various projects underway in Namibia, that will help us with mobilising concessionary financing." He added: "And we also mobilised about €500 million of a framework loan, that will be available to us in very concessionary terms as well.”

Speaking on behalf of business, Jesper Brodin, CEO of Ingka Group (IKEA Retail), said he had come away from COP27 filled with optimism for the commercial sector in particular: “I want to call out the companies here who are not waiting for legislation or pledges, but realise by their own ethical and moral motivations and understanding that sustainability and climate are not about making sacrifices. It might be about making upfront investments and taking some leaps of faith, but it's really about being a winner in the economy,” he said.

Anish Shah, Managing Director and CEO of Indian conglomerate Mahindra Group, added that it was time for business to: “Make it personal and ask what is the impact on the society that I live in? What is the impact on my company and on me as an individual, and not just in terms of threats, but also in terms of opportunities?”

Janet Ranganathan, Managing Director of Strategy, Learning and Results at the World Resources Institute (WRI), added every individual on the planet has a part to play too: “We need citizens to be holding countries accountable to see the policies being put in place and the money mobilised, otherwise it's all for nothing,” she said.

Youth raise their voice

One group of people certainly getting their voice heard at COP27 were the future generations, whose very planet that they inherit from today’s generation is at stake. Pato Kelesitse, Global Shaper at Gaborone Hub and Founder of Sustain 267, said: “When we use our money as young people, we need to know that whatever we're giving it to is what we're voting for. Whatever we're giving our money to is what we're demanding. So when businesses come to COP27 they need to know that if you're not going to get us closer to 1.5. You are not going to be getting our money.”

Looking ahead to COP28

For those companies who have not yet fully embraced ambitious climate action, the message from youth, civil society and business at the forefront of this agenda at COP27 was clear: the private sector has a unique role to play to provide the capital and solutions to meet our global climate goals. With the results of the Global Stocktake Process published at COP28 and the UN setting out its recommendations for robust climate action from non-state actors, 2023 will be about countries and companies showing how they are meeting their climate commitments, while pressure is still on to ramp up ambition.

The Annual Meeting in Davos will be a key milestone to build on the progress made at COP27 and to kick off the Road to COP28. Over 2,500 leaders from government, business and civil society across the world will gather in the Swiss town from 16-20 January 2023 to focus on the theme 'Cooperating in a fragmented world.' Find out more here

Original Article

Why these are the smartest and most sustainable cities
  • The IESE Cities in Motion Index compared 183 cities to determine the world’s smartest and most sustainable cities for 2022.

  • London heads the list for its strong human capital, international profile, urban planning, and governance.

  • Europe is home to the largest number of smart cities, with Paris, Berlin, Amsterdam, Oslo, and Copenhagen all earning a spot in the top ten.

Why these are the smartest and most sustainable cities

Published by World Economic Forum on 21 November 2022

Authors:

  • Joan Enric Ricart Costa, Professor of Strategic Management, IESE Business School, University of Navarra
  • Pascual Berrone, Professor of Strategic Management, IESE Business School, University of Navarra

Summary:

The IESE Cities in Motion Index compared 183 cities to determine the world’s smartest and most sustainable cities for 2022. Cover Image: João Barbosa/Unsplash

The world's cities, already grappling with ageing populations, multifarious social demands, and digital divides, are groaning under the strains of climate change and pandemic fallout. The economic and social consequences of the tragic war in Ukraine are likely to add additional stressors in the form of unemployment, inflation, segregation, and migration.

In this context, it’s more important than ever to diagnose where cities stand in terms of sustainability and quality of life for inhabitants - and to start building urban resilience to withstand future challenges.

But where to start? It’s a daunting task, but all cities should undertake a process of strategic review. In addition to assessing where they currently stand, cities should also consider their future priorities and what they aspire to be. IESE Cities in Motion Index offers a platform for a comprehensive initial diagnosis of the cities and, through comparative analysis, aims to serve as the first point of reference.

The IESE Cities in Motion Index evaluates 183 cities in 92 countries based on 9 criteria to determine the world’s smartest and most sustainable cities for 2022.

The IESE Cities in Motion Index evaluates 183 cities in 92 countries based on 9 criteria to determine the world’s smartest and most sustainable cities for 2022. Image: IESE Business School

The index compares 183 cities globally, looking at 114 criteria grouped into nine dimensions: human capital, social cohesion, economy, governance, environment, mobility and transportation, urban planning, international profile, and technology.

It's an unusual index in its scope of coverage – the cities are scattered across 92 countries - and its long-term vision of cities that puts people first in their various and complex needs. We look at standard metrics such as GDP per capita, and less traditional items like the number of electric vehicle charging points, how many museums and galleries there are, and how cities rate racial tolerance.

The top ten most sustainable cities

1) London. London’s human capital, international profile, urban planning, and governance lifted it to first place in this year’s ranking. The city's drawbacks flow from the U.K.'s weaker capital in social cohesion and environment.

2) New York’s economy is its biggest strength, but the city also stands out in areas of mobility and transportation, urban planning, human capital, and international profile. Like London, New York is relatively weaker in its social cohesion and environment.

3) Paris ranked well in its international profile, mobility and transportation, and human capital but tiered lower in its environment.

4) Tokyo sports a strong economy, international profile, governance, and technology. The city ranked lower in its urban planning and mobility and transportation.

5) Berlin is a well-balanced city, performing well in many dimensions, notably in its governance, urban planning, and human capital. Its weakest flank was the economy.

6) Washington D.C. is robust in human capital, technology, governance, and urban planning – but can improve in social cohesion and the environment.

7) Singapore’s technology and international profile are standout areas, while environment and mobility are the city state’s weaker capacities.

The last three cities to fill out the list are northern European cities that tend to perform well across a variety of dimensions. Amsterdam (8) fares particularly well in technology, Oslo (9) in the environment, and Copenhagen (10) in social cohesion and environment.

IESE Cities in Motion Index Top 10 smartest sustainable cities

IESE Cities in Motion Index Top 10. London tops the list of the world's smartest and most sustainable cities. Image: IESE Business School​​​​​

Revealing regional comparisons

The severity of pandemic-fuelled economic swings since 2020 has been critical for cities. In previous editions – this is our eighth – cities advanced and declined for a multitude of reasons. In this edition, the weight of the economy was decisive.

Dublin, one of the few cities to expect economic growth, jumped to 18th overall. Buenos Aires (103), which competes with Santiago (75) for regional dominance in our ranking, fell far behind its regional rival, battered especially by the economy.

Regional comparisons are also revealing. Europe, overall, is home to the largest number of smart cities. While many have been buffeted by the pandemic, the underlying strengths and quality of life in European cities, held them in good stead.

Cities in developing countries are still struggling across most metrics, and the recent economic and health crises have added to those struggles. All African cities included in the index are at the bottom of the overall ranking: while the region wasn’t as adversely affected by the pandemic as initially expected, the health crisis has had serious economic, political, and social consequences. Latin American countries are also near the bottom, a particular cause for concern since it’s one of the regions with the highest urban concentration on the planet.

Asian cities that perform well tend to get a boost from their expanding economies and their promotion of technology. Technology is also where a handful of Middle Eastern cities – Dubai and Abu Dhabi – fare best, although generally, the region has a long way to go in creating smart, sustainable cities.

Economics are also a decisive factor for US cities: six of the top 10 cities in the economic dimension are American; none of the top ten cities in social cohesion or environment is American.

Criteria for IESE Cities in Motion Index most sustainable cities

Criteria used by IESE Cities in Motion Index to determine the most sustainable cities in the world. Image: IESE Business School

Expanding urban resilience

In the past, urban resilience has focused on readiness for a natural disaster. We must expand our understanding of resilience beyond infrastructure to encompass sustainable ecosystems, innovative activities, equity among citizens, and connected territory.

City managers should be able to lead by example, guided by the principles of justice and collaboration and by a vision of the future that includes all citizens. The concept of smart governance, which includes accurate diagnosis, a clear vision, and a multidimensional approach to managing challenges, is crucial.

And it’s not just the responsibility of the public sector. Developing urban resilience - the ability of cities to overcome adverse circumstances, whatever they are - can only be achieved if all stakeholders are involved.

The public sector, private companies, civic organizations, and academic institutions must work together and take a holistic approach to what makes a city not only viable, but livable, just, and resilient.

For more information:

Download the full Cities in Motion Index 2022 report

Go to the interactive map and calculator

Download our Cities in Motion Index 2022 infographic

Retrieved from https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/11/why-these-are-the-smartest-and-most-sustainable-cities/?utm_source=sfmc&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2789441_Agenda_weekly-25November2022&utm_term=&emailType=Agenda%20Weekly

How Just Transition can help deliver the Paris Agreement
This new report unpacks why a just transition is central to delivering the Paris Agreement and Sustainable Development Goals, analyses key global and regional trends, and explores what a just transition means for UNDP’s work. 

How Just Transition can help deliver the Paris Agreement

Published by UNDP Climate Promise

How a Just Transition can help deliver the Paris Agreement

The importance of just transition is now recognized

A green transition to a net-zero future is key to unlocking the Paris Agreement’s global climate goals. However, if not managed well, the required socioeconomic transformation runs the risk of further increasing social inequality, exclusion, civil unrest, and less competitive businesses, sectors, and markets. Increasingly, countries are acknowledging these risks and in turn are taking action to integrate a just and equitable transition of their economies into their short- and long-term climate plans, known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and Long-Term Strategies (LTS).

While the concept of just transition is widely used to advocate for social justice and equity in climate action, there is no universally accepted definition, and the perception varies between countries and regions. For UNDP, just transition is fundamentally about principle, process, and practice. UNDP’s framework of support therefore involves increasing country awareness of the principles of a just transition, strengthening their ability to engage in just transition processes, and developing capacity to implement just transition practices. 

UNDP analysis reveals that, as of 31 October 2022, just transition principles are now reflected in 38% of NDCs, 56% of LTS, and a growing number of high-profile global initiatives. More, however, needs to be done.

UNDP’s framework for incorporating just transition in NDCs and LTS 

UNDP has been working through the Climate Promise to support countries to connect the dots between climate action, social inclusion and gender equality, and sustainable development.

As part of these efforts, four key entry points have been identified for integrating just transition into NDCs and LTS:

Just Transition Framework

  1. Assessments;
  2. Engagement through social dialogues and stakeholder engagement;
  3. Institutional, policy, and capacity-building support; and
  4. Finance.

Under the Climate Promise, UNDP has supported, or is supporting, 34 countries and territories to strengthen just transition across these four areas (see map below).

Download the report to learn how UNDP is partnering with SerbiaSouth AfricaCosta RicaIndia, and Antigua and Barbuda on their visions for a green, just, and net-zero future.

Continue reading: https://climatepromise.undp.org/research-and-reports/how-just-transition-can-help-deliver-paris-agreement

Download the full report here: https://climatepromise.undp.org/sites/default/files/research_report_document/UNDP_Just_Transition_Report_0.pdf

or access the PDF attachment of the full report.

How Just Transition can help deliver the Paris Agreement

This new report unpacks why a just transition is central to delivering the Paris Agreement and Sustainable Development Goals, analyses key global and regional trends, and explores what a just transition means for UNDP’s work. 

How Just Transition can help deliver the Paris Agreement

Published by UNDP Climate Promise

This new report unpacks why a just transition is central to delivering the Paris Agreement and Sustainable Development Goals, analyses key global and regional trends, and explores what a just transition means for UNDP’s work. 

How a Just Transition can help deliver the Paris Agreement

The importance of just transition is now recognized

A green transition to a net-zero future is key to unlocking the Paris Agreement’s global climate goals. However, if not managed well, the required socioeconomic transformation runs the risk of further increasing social inequality, exclusion, civil unrest, and less competitive businesses, sectors, and markets. Increasingly, countries are acknowledging these risks and in turn are taking action to integrate a just and equitable transition of their economies into their short- and long-term climate plans, known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and Long-Term Strategies (LTS).

While the concept of just transition is widely used to advocate for social justice and equity in climate action, there is no universally accepted definition, and the perception varies between countries and regions. For UNDP, just transition is fundamentally about principle, process, and practice. UNDP’s framework of support therefore involves increasing country awareness of the principles of a just transition, strengthening their ability to engage in just transition processes, and developing capacity to implement just transition practices. 

UNDP analysis reveals that, as of 31 October 2022, just transition principles are now reflected in 38% of NDCs, 56% of LTS, and a growing number of high-profile global initiatives. More, however, needs to be done.

UNDP’s framework for incorporating just transition in NDCs and LTS 

UNDP has been working through the Climate Promise to support countries to connect the dots between climate action, social inclusion and gender equality, and sustainable development.

As part of these efforts, four key entry points have been identified for integrating just transition into NDCs and LTS:

Just Transition Framework

  1. Assessments;
  2. Engagement through social dialogues and stakeholder engagement;
  3. Institutional, policy, and capacity-building support; and
  4. Finance.

Under the Climate Promise, UNDP has supported, or is supporting, 34 countries and territories to strengthen just transition across these four areas (see map below).

Download the report to learn how UNDP is partnering with SerbiaSouth AfricaCosta RicaIndia, and Antigua and Barbuda on their visions for a green, just, and net-zero future.

Continue reading: https://climatepromise.undp.org/research-and-reports/how-just-transition-can-help-deliver-paris-agreement

Download the full report here: https://climatepromise.undp.org/sites/default/files/research_report_document/UNDP_Just_Transition_Report_0.pdf

or access the PDF attachment of the full report.

How to use fog to give water to Lima’s defenders of nature
Few megacities were settled in a desert. Lima is one of them. Unlike the rest of Peru, here water is a naturally scarce resource that depends on glaciers that climate change has already melted by 51% in this country, according to the National Water Authority. Without rain, but with a lot of fog, in this South American capital the communities that defend the hills have found in this thick mist an alternative to water scarcity that could mark a before and after in Peru’s commitment to the climate fight.

How to use fog to give water to Lima’s defenders of nature

Defenders of the fog oases, the last green belt in Peru’s capital, have organized to use fog as a solution to water shortages and the climate crisis

Originally published by UNDP Peru on 28 October 2020

By Sally Jabiel

“Here in the fog oases there is no water, but they are very humid and there is a lot of fog. Our pilot project turns fog into water”, explains Noé Neira, president of the Lomas Paraíso Association, which protects this unique and seasonal ecosystem that only emerges in winter when the arid hills of Lima turn green. “Before the fog catchers, each of the neighbors gathered a bucket of water and went up on Sundays to water the plants,” he says.

According to the Coastal Fog Oases Map in Lima, between 2005 and 2017 450.73 out of 19 435.81 hectares of this fragile ecosystem have been lost to land invasion and trafficking. And, despite the neighboring communities trying to reforest them, they lack sufficient water. “We only have water from two o’clock to six in the afternoon. That forces us to store it in drums and tanks and expose our health,” says Ana María Sotomayor, a neighbor and defender of the Lomas de Primavera.

In effect, around 700,000 people from the capital’s poorest districts — many surrounded by fog oases — do not have access to a water service network, according to the National Superintendency of Sanitation Services (SUNASS).

Being the third most vulnerable country to the climate crisis, on top of the continued loss of glaciers, puts water availability at risk, especially in the capital where access to water is already quite unequal. “The concentration of our economic activity and our population in the arid strip of the territory make water management extremely important to address in the country’s adaptation agenda,” says Gabriel Quijandría, Minister of Environment of that country. Hence, the staunch governmental response to this climate emergency through its Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC, for its acronym in English) where water is one of the priorities for adaptation to climate change.

For more than 20 months, a joint effort by multiple sectors and actors of the Peruvian government developed a roadmap to implement these NDCs and, through this, fulfill the country’s commitment to the Paris Agreement to adapt to climate impacts. Based on a participatory process with multiple actors and government sectors, the United Nations Development Programme’s NDC Support Program — financed by Spain, Germany and the European Union — helped to generate the NDC water roadmap. The result is a total of 30 measures framed in three uses of water: population, agricultural and energy; as well as in the multisectoral management of this resource.

From planning to action

“Water plays an important role. If we lose the fog oases, then we would also lose the condensation of the mist and we would be at the mercy of the consequences of climate change”, warns Ascensio Vásquez, president of the Lomas de Primavera Ecological Association.

This climate planning and its results have laid the foundations for pilots like the one that is being developed from the communities that protect the fog oases. With the support of the NDC Support Program and the “Conservation, management and rehabilitation of the fragile fog oases ecosystems” initiative, also known EBA Lomas, to demonstrate the approach of the roadmap of water.

El trabajo de Ascencio Vásquez al proteger las lomas en Lima ha sido homenajeado por el Congreso de la República que lo reconoce como defensor ambiental.

“We have installed a fog catcher in the upper part 800 meters up high in the fog oases,” says Vásquez. “From there the networks come and the water reaches the reservoirs that are in the upper part and then we go down until we reach the plants that we have planted in the greenhouses.” With the right conditions, each fog catcher can capture up to 60 liters of water per day per square meter. This liquid, only suitable for agricultural use, is distributed drop by drop, in an automated irrigation system, to the greenhouses filled with tara trees (Caesalpinia spinosa), a native species used for medicinal purposes since pre-Incan times, that has practically disappeared from the fog oases.

According to estimates by EbA Lomas, these nurseries have the capacity to produce 10,000 tara trees in five months.

This production, in addition to serving to reforest the hills, can be sold and used to promote ecotourism for the benefit of these communities that protect this green belt that borders the capital. This integrates the fog oases into the climate change adaptation strategy, and as minister Quijandría puts it, “incorporates urban planning and creates opportunities to generate wellbeing and income for the local population”.

Right to the fog

Although 13,500 hectares of the fog oases are already protected as a Regional Conservation Area by the Municipality of Lima, the success of pilots like this one also lies in the empowerment of the communities and their inclusion in decision-making to conserve this ecosystem. “They already know that they cannot touch the fog oases today, it is forbidden and they cannot invade that part. I feel a bit liberated by that,” says Sotomayor, who for defending these spaces, along with Vásquez, has received death threats from land trafficker mafias.

Therefore, in addition to empowering these environmental defenders, this pilot project is working with local governments where the hills are to better understand the value of these areas for the availability of water, lining their priorities with the NDCs. Likewise, a climate monitoring station is being implemented to alert authorities of illegal activities in the territory that could put the fog oases and, therefore, the availability of water at risk.

To be able to face these risks, the pilot project works alongside district municipalities where the fog oases are located to increase conscience about the importance of protecting these ecosystems. Complemented by a climate monitoring station which is being implemented to alert authorities of illegal activities in the territory that could put the fog oases and, therefore, the availability of water at risk. This station is being linked with the climate monitoring station developed by EbA Lomas, the only one of its kind that predicts episodes of high fog.

“Fog catchers are very economical instruments, because they avoid the use of drinking water for irrigation and also make it easy to obtain water from the peaks and store it,” explains Neira. This is why the pilot is seeing how feasible it is to create rights to exploit the use of mist, placing special emphasis on the fact that it would be rights over an area and not a catchment point. This analysis has been shared with the National Water Authority, which will evaluate considering modifications to its administrative process to include rules for the use of mist water.

The water of the future

Bringing water to almost nine million inhabitants is the challenge of Lima, a constantly growing capital that is among the 20 cities with the highest risk of water stress in the world. As climate change gets more severe, experiences like this one open new opportunities for adaptation, facing a scenario where half the population could be left without water.

This experience undertaken by the communities of the fog oases — which themselves do not have regular drinking water — is an example of how the solutions to the climate crisis and other development challenges lie in nature.

“Water is life. If there is no water, there is no humanity, there are no plants, there is nothing. It would be a desert,” says Neira. More than just a community-based approach, this solution is aligned with the Nationally Determined Contributions, and if it continues to be beneficial it could be replicated in other arid and vulnerable areas, thus being part of the country’s climate struggle for a future where nature is at the center of our decisions.

Retrieved from https://pnudperu.medium.com/how-to-use-fog-to-give-water-to-limas-defenders-of-nature-98d013f11779

Parallel Session on UNDP's Study: "Greening of the Philippines’ Recovery and Resilience Strategies"

Parallel Session on UNDP's Study: "Greening of the Philippines’ Recovery and Resilience Strategies"

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), with support from the

Government of the United Kingdom, and in collaboration with Global Factor and ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability, has undertaken a study on green recovery in the Philippines. The study aims to take advantage of the opportunity to redesign the development trajectory of the country after the COVID-19 pandemic towards a greener and more sustainable one.  

This virtual session will be held on 10 November 2022, 10:30 AM – 12:00 NN (Philippines time), via Zoom to discuss the key results and highlights of the study and how the national government, local governments, and private sector can lead the way in reframing and rewriting the Philippines’ development trajectory towards a greener one. 

Specifically, the parallel session aims to: 

  • Present the highlights of the report’s comparison of the Philippines taking a business-as-usual approach versus green recovery simulations;  
  • Present green recovery entry points and recommendations for the country’s agriculture, construction, manufacturing, and transport sectors;  
  • Present selected LGUs’ initiatives aligned with green recovery and key takeaways from these efforts;  
  • Gather perspectives of technical and policy experts and representatives from national agencies; local government units, private sector, non-government organizations, academia, and other stakeholders on green recovery efforts and its adoption in the country.

Interested attendees may register via this link: https://bit.ly/greenrecoveryPHAttached, for your reference, is the session's indicative agenda.  

Should you have questions and clarifications, please contact ICLEI SEAS Communications Officer Mr. Chris Noel Hidalgo at chris.hidalgo@iclei.org or via the mobile number (+63) 961-919-6055. 

Cover Photo of Manila, Philippines from Unsplash: https://unsplash.com/photos/vL2h7xYiIlk

From Risk to Resilience: Building a Local Climate of Success

This Making Cities Resilient 2030 (MCR2030) webinar series profiles local governments that are seizing the moment to move from climate risk to climate resilience. As this ‘window of opportunity’ narrows, these municipalities are demonstrating that climate action is an investment and not a cost.

The first webinar brings together two local governments – Wroclaw, in Poland, and Kampala, in Uganda – who will outline their own climate resilience ambitions and actions and share practical policy recommendations for other municipalities to scale up their risk reduction efforts.

From Risk to Resilience: Building a Local Climate of Success

by United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR)

This Making Cities Resilient 2030 (MCR2030) webinar series profiles local governments that are seizing the moment to move from climate risk to climate resilience. As this ‘window of opportunity’ narrows, these municipalities are demonstrating that climate action is an investment and not a cost.

The first webinar brings together two local governments – Wroclaw, in Poland, and Kampala, in Uganda – who will outline their own climate resilience ambitions and actions and share practical policy recommendations for other municipalities to scale up their risk reduction efforts.

Register Here 

COP27: A chance to act - we can still make a difference

We know what we need to do, and how to make our planet clean, sustainable, and equitable. We have the technology and the evidence to act. What we need more than anything is political will and investment. COP27, taking place in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, is an opportunity to stop talking and start acting. Change is happening around us, and the Paris Agreement points the way.

COP27: A chance to act - We can still make a difference

Published by UNDP on 2 November 2022

The 27th United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP27, comes at the tail end of a record-smashing summer for the northern hemisphere.

Punishing early spring heatwaves in South Asia killed hundreds. Many countries recorded the highest temperatures since records began, more than 120 years ago. Europeans experienced their hottest summer in 500 years, accompanied by wildfires, droughts and death. Major rivers reached record low levels. In August a third of Pakistan flooded, with devastating consequences for its people and economy. China experienced its hottest temperature ever, and several cities in Iraq became the hottest places on earth, with temperatures of more than 50C/122F. Hurricane Ian, which slammed the Caribbean and the United States, offered further proof that no country is immune from the effects of climate change.

These events are not an aberration. The last seven years have been the hottest ever recorded. And they’re just a taste of what to expect if we continue to fail to act on global heating.

There is no time to lose. We are rapidly approaching dangerous tipping points for every aspect of human life, from our health and safety, our natural environment, our economies, to our property and infrastructure.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres has said climate action must be our “top global priority”.

Change is possible, hope is imperative

And yet the future is not written. The climate and nature crises are not inevitable. We can still make a difference.

We know what we need to do, and how to make our planet clean, sustainable, and equitable. We have the technology and the evidence to act. What we need more than anything is political will and investment.

COP27, taking place in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, is an opportunity to stop talking and start acting.

Change is happening around us, and the Paris Agreement points the way. 

A photo in this story

A photo in this story

COP27 will be about “planning for implementation” for all the promises and pledges around net-zero commitments, the protection of forests and climate finance made last year during COP26 in Glasgow. Photos: Shutterstock

Last year, COP26 laid the groundwork for further, and more ambitious action. The Glasgow Climate Pact aimed to turn the 2020s into a decade of committed climate action—ramping up efforts to ensure that we are resilient in the face of climate change, while at the same time curbing greenhouse gas emissions. For the first time, nations were called on to phase out coal power and inefficient—and inequitable—fossil fuel subsidies.

Each country’s national pledge – their nationally determined contributions (NDCs) – offers a unique blueprint for immediate climate action. NDCs are politically- backed tools for defining and advancing sustainable development pathways.

In country after country, UNDP has witnessed, alongside our key partners, the transformation that takes place when leadership, political will and investment come together.

UNDP has been supporting governments and citizens on the frontlines of climate action and has seen firsthand the benefits and opportunities of investing in NDCs. UNDP’s Climate Promise supports 84 percent of all developing country NDC submissions.

Our Global Policy Network has a vast portfolio of multilateral, bilateral, and vertical funds. The Nature, Climate and Energy portfolio spans 137 countries and 802 projects, including the UN’s largest portfolio on climate.

UNDP’s Sustainable Energy Hub is helping deliver on these targets while simultaneously accelerating progress towards other SDGs. The Sustainable Finance Hub is supporting governments, the private sector and international financial institutions to ramp up financing for the SDGs.

Country targets

To pay for urgent climate action, UNDP is working with the Indonesian government as it becomes a world leader in “green sukuks”—Islamic bonds which have raised more than US$2.75 billion.

Lebanon has focused on integrating the economic and societal benefits of climate action by aligning its NDCs with national development plans. A Lebanon Green Investment Facility will support projects and financial instruments for the private sector. UNDP is supporting these efforts alongside the World Bank and the Islamic Development Bank.

Peru has estimated that around 40 percent of the US$91 billion funding gap needed to implement its NDC priorities between now and 2030 is best suited for private sector investments. Plans for green finance and for private and finance sector engagement have been prepared, along with a permanent consultative group that includes 20 of the country’s largest business groups. Preparations for green bonds and carbon bonds are well underway.

As Serbia begins the move away from coal as the dominant energy source it’s also ensuring that the transition is equitable. With support from UNDP, the government of Japan and the EU, the government is defining a strategy to ensure that all those dependent on the intensive use of fossil fuels will not be left behind. Business models and green technology investments that help to de-carbonize the economy and industry will be advanced.

UNDP and ILO worked with Zimbabwe on a green jobs assessment. It found climate policies present a huge potential for job creation, especially for women and young people. In conservation agriculture alone, up to 30,000 jobs could be created for every $1million invested.

The right side of history

The decisions we make today will affect not only the almost 8 billion people who live on our planet, but every person in every generation to come.

We do not need to choose between solving the energy crisis, the food security crisis, the biodiversity crisis and the climate crisis.

Every dollar invested in renewable energy creates three times more jobs than in the fossil fuel industry, while energy efficiency investments can create five times as many.

Early adaptation investments offer a 1:3 rate of return over the next decade, and a $1.8 trillion investment in adaptation measures would save $7.1 trillion in avoided costs.

Sustainably managed forests could create $230 billion in business opportunities and 16 million jobs by 2030.

UNDP calls on all governments, private sector, civil society and communities to champion and invest in responding to this global emergency.

We need political will, technical and financial support to drive the much-needed transformation toward net zero and climate resilience. The world has made promises through NDCs – now we must fulfill them.

For the original article and additional visuals, visit https://stories.undp.org/cop27-a-chance-to-act?utm_source=social&utm_medium=undp&utm_campaign=cop27

COP27’s Success Hinges on Loss and Damage Finance Discussions

For decades, vulnerable nations have called for financial support from rich countries to help them cope with increasingly alarming and damaging climate impacts that they hold little responsibility for causing. Yet many developed countries, including the U.S. and E.U., have long resisted their requests. The upcoming U.N. climate summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt (COP27) offers an opportunity to break the stalemate on this critical issue and start taking action. Here’s how:

COP27’s Success Hinges on Loss and Damage Finance Discussions

Authors: Ani Dasgupta and Preety Bhandari | Published by World Resources Institute (WRI) on 28 October 2022

Cover Image by: Abdul Majeed/EU Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid

Since the monsoon season started in June, the worst floods in Pakistan’s history have killed 1,700 people and left more than 33 million homeless. One-third of the entire country was under water at one point, decimating its crops, destroying clean water sources and infrastructure, and causing $40 billion in damages. The destruction is projected to lower Pakistan’s GDP growth from 5% in FY2022 to 2% in FY2023.

This is not just an extreme weather event — it's an economic disaster. And while these numbers lay out the costs and scale of devastation, they fail to factor in the full impact — from the emotional and physical toll on affected families, to the effort and courage needed to rebuild.

Pakistan is far from the only country to experience climate-fueled disasters this year. Droughts in Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia have killed millions of livestock and destroyed crops. Spiking temperatures in the Sahel — a region spanning 10 countries and home to 135 million people — are drying up water supplies and threatening to trigger a major food and migration crisis.

These are the devastating impacts communities around the world are living with under just 1.1 degrees C (2 degrees F) of global temperature rise — and the world is on track to warm far more than that. As Pakistan’s recent flooding illustrates, much of the destruction already goes beyond the limits of many families’ and communities’ ability to adapt. These “losses and damages” occur when climate impacts cannot be avoided, either due to reaching the climate tipping point of irreversible impacts or due to lack of resources to adapt.

Loss and damage disproportionally affects vulnerable populations — people on the front lines of the crisis with the least resources. Almost always, these are also the people who have contributed the least to the problem. Each dollar of damage has a more severe impact in a poor, vulnerable community than in a wealthier one. Climate impacts are happening across the world, but it is only the rich countries that have the resources to weather them. For example, the recent devastation of Hurricane Ian in the U.S. may have caused $67 billion in damages, but thanks to insurance coverage, property owners will be able to recover more easily. While cutting greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to climate impacts is crucial, it is clear that these measures are not enough to avoid significant losses and damages in many vulnerable countries.

1) Make loss and damage finance a standing agenda item in formal negotiations.

On day one of the COP27 summit, developed nations must answer the call of the G77 — a bloc of 134 developing countries currently chaired by Pakistan — and shift from “listening mode” into action mode.

While developed nations have agreed through the U.N.’s Santiago Network to provide technical support to developing countries for addressing loss and damage, last year at COP26, wealthy nations rejected the proposal for a loss and damage finance mechanism. Instead, they agreed to a two-year dialogue ending in 2024 to discuss possible funding arrangements. These are informal sessions with no decision-making authority. Adopting loss and damage finance arrangements as a formal agenda item at COP27 in Egypt can help reach consensus on solutions.

Encouragingly Frans Timmerman, the EU’s leading climate negotiator, has already signaled support for a “formal space on the agenda to discuss this challenge.” Similarly, U.S. Special Climate Envoy John Kerry has indicated that the U.S. is determined to make progress. It remains to be seen what the agreed formulation of this agenda item will be, and those details will matter. One thing is certain: If funding on loss and damage doesn’t get on the formal agenda, the climate summit could be derailed right from the start.

2) Developed nations must move on from the old narrative of liability and compensation and step up finance in solidarity with vulnerable nations.

Wealthy nations have long pushed back on the notion of providing finance for loss and damage, arguing that it may be construed as an obligation for liability and compensation. However, at the U.N. climate summit in Paris in 2015, countries agreed through the Paris Agreement decision that loss and damage does not involve liability and compensation. Progress on finance for loss and damage should not be held back at COP27 by an already-settled debate.

Developed countries should provide funds for addressing losses and damages not because of legal liability, but because supporting vulnerable countries is the right thing to do — not only for the people facing existential threats from climate change, but for the stability and security of the entire global community. In a recent interview, Dr. Saleemul Huq from the International Centre for Climate Change and Development and an ACT2025 partner said that what developing countries are asking for is “finance for loss and damage in the spirit of solidarity.”

Even if vulnerable nations all went zero-emissions tomorrow, past emissions from the G20 have locked in a high climate impacts scenario that disproportionately affects poorer nations. G20 countries represent about 10% of all countries but emit 75% of the world's greenhouse gases. In comparison, sub-Saharan Africa represents 25.5% of all countries, but only contributes 4.7% of emissions.

Furthermore, countries have vastly different capacities for mitigation and mobilizing finance, and global finances are incredibly skewed toward the richer, more powerful nations. When coupled with the existing debt crises in many vulnerable countries, large sums of losses and damages will likely push them into a severe financial crunch. We need solidarity to help address this critical challenge.

3) Countries must launch a process at COP27 to identify and establish funding arrangements at COP28 in 2023.

The most pressing steps for negotiators involve identifying where and for what financing is most needed, and how to quickly mobilize the necessary funds. Negotiators will need to examine whether existing finance channels such as the Green Climate Fund and Global Environment Facility can help, assess how a new dedicated financing mechanism could complement them, and explore new and innovative pathways for financing. One idea: U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres called on developed countries to tax the windfall profits of oil and gas companies and redirect some of those revenues to recovery efforts in nations affected by climate disasters.

Countries should apply lessons learned from funds and institutions established under the UNFCCC, including the Green Climate Fund and the Adaptation Fund.

Outside of the UNFCCC process, the past year has seen several promising new initiatives — including Denmark’s loss and damage finance pledge, the V20’s new funding program under its multi-donor trust fund, Germany’s G7 proposal on the Global Shield against Climate Risks, and Scotland’s continued push for loss and damage finance (on the heels of its own $2.2-million commitment). These efforts are welcomed and inspiring, but they should not detract from the need for a broader multilateral funding approach that prioritizes public sources of funding for addressing loss and damage.

COP27 should kickstart a timebound decision-making process for formalizing funding arrangements for responding to loss and damage under the UNFCCC, while ensuring coherence with the larger landscape of financing outside the UNFCCC.

No More Delay in Financing Loss and Damage

The number one litmus test for the success of COP27 negotiations is progress on mobilizing finance for addressing loss and damage. Further delay is indefensible — not only would it be a major loss for COP27, but the fallout would be felt in vulnerable nations and communities for years to come.

It’s time to stop avoiding the realities of the current global climate crisis. Loss and damage is the third pillar to addressing climate change, alongside curbing emissions and adapting to impacts. COP27 is an opportunity for all countries to act on that reality.

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